3d art – Arkenyon http://arkenyon.com/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:38:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://arkenyon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-24-150x150.png 3d art – Arkenyon http://arkenyon.com/ 32 32 correct modeling for game developement (poly count) – 2D and 3D Art https://arkenyon.com/correct-modeling-for-game-developement-poly-count-2d-and-3d-art/ https://arkenyon.com/correct-modeling-for-game-developement-poly-count-2d-and-3d-art/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:38:22 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/?p=210 correct modeling for game developement (poly count) – 2D and 3D Art – GameDev.net Don’t have a GameDev.net account? Sign up Forgot your password? Please contact us if you have any trouble resetting your password. ” alt=”Giuno” itemprop=”image”> September 21, 2016 05:16 AM Hello again everybody, I recently completed the introduction course on zbrush 2016 […]]]>








correct modeling for game developement (poly count) – 2D and 3D Art – GameDev.net












” alt=”Giuno” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 05:16 AM

Hello again everybody,

I recently completed the introduction course on zbrush 2016 from the site pluralsight and I got a brief overview of the software. I even got a decent looking character model at the end, for a beginner of course, but it turned out better than I thought it would. But with that whole process, came a few questions. And I don’t even know how to start asking.

I hear a lot of talk about low poly modelling for game development and see that there are a lot of videos and courses about this topic, but this whole concept is somewhat confusing. Correct me if I’m wrong, but the whole process works somewhat like this:

  • Start with a simple base model and low polys to get the base shape and topology of the object right. Add/subdivide as many polys as you need, to get as much detail as you want on the model with the sculpting tools. Create some sort of map (sorry don’t know much of the names yet) of the high poly model, and then bake (whatever that means) that map onto the low poly model of that object.

Is that correct? Am I missing some crucial steps?

Another question that I have is: How many polys is actually low poly? I guess it depends. Let’s say for a PC Game like Diablo 3, Path of Exile and so on. How many polys should a character have and how many the models that shape the environment, a house, a barn or a wagon? And is there a rule on how many models/objects a “level” should have? Let’s say a whole map of diablo 3 after a loading screen.

Man I know these questions are probably not good, but I have these questions in the back of my head and I can’t get rid of them.

Thanks for your time and effort to help! I really appreciate it





” alt=”NumberXaero” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 06:32 AM

Thats pretty much correct, the baking youre referring to is common to generate a normal map (and other maps, AO, etc). The general idea is you have a low poly and a high poly that essentially match/lineup except they have different poly counts, and therefore the higher poly one is more detailed. You “bake” these high poly details into a texture (like a normal map) and then apply the normal map to the low poly in game for lighting calcs, etc.

Youre missing steps in the sense that it can be a little more involved, depends on the tools/process used, normal map output depends on the target engine/software format, conventions, etc. and as I understand it, its not exactly hard to generate bad maps containing errors if the input models are not what/where they need to be.

a program called x-normal is often used for the “bake” process.

As for poly counts, again its sort of target dependent, what are they for, I believe the characters in doom 3 if I remember were somewhere between 1500-3000, thats probably on

the lower end these days, but again its depends on the target use and the effects that will be applied to it, it really could be anything. Two triangles for a wall in the world with a lot

of effects on it might do the job. For the high poly bake source, ive seen extremely high counts, 100s of thousands or more depending. But again it depends on whats needed.





” alt=”Hodgman” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 07:08 AM

Triangle counts don’t mean as much as they used to, especially now that we’re drawing several million pixels (tens of thousands of triangles seems minuscule in comparison!).

If you have triangles that become smaller than a pixel when viewed from the intended distance, then you have too many triangles. Ideally, a triangle would cover roughly an 8×8 pixel area (or more), and at worst, around a 2×2 pixel area. Games tend to use several LODs of a model (levels of detail — different versions of the model with more/less triangles) and the game will automatically pick the right LOD to use at the right distance to maintain a suitable triangle density.





” alt=”_Silence_” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 07:49 AM

Normal-mapping is an imagery-effect to move the details from the geometry (triangles) into the texture. This fakes the geometry detail on the image and since you provide extra normal values which are (generally) non-linear between each vertex of a face, then you lit the geometry as if it was not flat (but it is). This works well as long as the faces do not cover a too-big region in the screen.

This is why you need both the explanations mentioned above: put a higher-detailed normal-map into a lower-poly geometry, and have different levels of details of the geometry (and the normal-map) and choose accordingly, depending on the screen coverage.





” alt=”Giuno” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 08:37 AM

Okay, nice I think I understand. Thanks for all the answers. So that means, if I have a game in Birdseye view (top down) and the player can adjust the camera zoom, the LOD should go down the farer away he zooms and go up as he zooms in. At least this is how the pros do it for performance I guess? Or are there any other reasons for this method?

Another question I asked myself as I was learning from videos and courses.

Sometimes when I watch someone build an environment scene in a game engine like Unreal, Unity or Cry, they use two different approaches or a mix of them.

One group works with a lot of building blocks like single walls to build a whole house, or single head sized stones to build a small wall out of them. Or they use models of single wood planks, stick them together and build a wood wall/roof/floor like this.

Other people just have the whole thing modeled beforehand in a modeling software and just insert the whole building to the scene.

Are there any reasons or benefits to have the whole model done before implementing it to the game engine, and are there downsides to have the building made out of that many pieces? Simply asked, what is the different and how do these two approaches influence the game in the end?

Question 2: Would it be highly uncommon to use 3ds max and zbrush for modeling, and then use Maya for rigging and Animation?

My head is full of questions and I don’t know where else I could get the answers. So sorry.

Thanks for all the help, I really appreciate all of you.





” alt=”_Silence_” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 09:02 AM

That’s it. We can do so in order to avoid artifacts for example, z-fighting issues, aliasing with textures…

Game editors (or engine editors) are not modelers. They might most of them provide tools to work on or create the models, but they are not meant to modelize.

For things like walls, first because this is easy to model, and also because walls could help the engine having better performances (occluders and such), one would generally model them directly in the editor. But they could also be imported from a model (for example if the wall has a lot of geometry details, like holes, hills and other discontinuities).

But for more complex things (characters, cars, trees and so on), people will tend to model them in a modeler, create different levels of details, and different normal maps, then import them in the editor.

This is my knowledge about this. Real game developers will give more exact answers 🙂





” alt=”Giuno” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 09:44 AM

Oh damn you got my question the wrong way, sorry I have some trouble explaining what I mean, since English is not my native language.

I try better this time.

I didn’t mean, that they create the models inside the engine. I meant that some people use the modeling software to create a whole building model as one and import that whole building as an object/asset/model/static mesh (sorry don’t know the right terminology) into the Game engine like unreal and put that with the editor into the scene to build the level.

Other people use the modeling software to create the parts which make a whole building, like the walls, roofs, floors, doors, windows, steps etc. and they import these models all separated from each other into the game engine, and use these inside the editor of the game engine as building blocks, to create a whole building.

I wanted to know how these two approaches influence the game in the end (if they do). I hope I explained better this time. So sorry. I’m not very good at asking questions.





” alt=”_Silence_” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 11:11 AM

What I answered before is still valid for your clarification.

Sometimes, some engines require to know each part of a thing, let’s say, as you talked about it, a building. Doing so, will allow to easily tell to the game editor that this is a wall, this is not a wall, this is a room, this is a door. Each of them will be recognized as different things in the engine: the walls will allow to split the building into different areas, or to tell that all what is behind cannot be seen (major occluder), the doors will allow to create portals in between these areas, and so on…

All of this is generally done so that to improve the performance of the rendering engine. Nowadays, this is less true, but some engines still require to tell that this geometry is a major occluder, this area is a portal, this set of walls is considered as a portal area…

And even if the engine does not require to know all of this, or if the engine editor allows to select sub-pieces of the geometry, people will tend to have different manners to work. For example, when you dispatch a building into many pieces, some pieces might be easily reused. For example, you can reuse the doors in several locations, so this will allow to save the amount of geometry, thus allowing to require less memory to the graphic card, thus allowing the engine to do some instancing…

Hope I went on your direction this time 🙂





” alt=”Scouting Ninja” itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 06:35 PM

Start with a simple base model and low polys to get the base shape and topology of the object right. Add/subdivide as many polys as you need, to get as much detail as you want on the model with the sculpting tools. Create some sort of map (sorry don’t know much of the names yet) of the high poly model, and then bake (whatever that means) that map onto the low poly model of that object.

That is one way to do it, however some times your final and base model looks nothing alike, at this point you will build a lower poly model around the high poly model; this is known as retopology.

Another question that I have is: How many polys is actually low poly?

Yes like many things in game development it depends.

For unreal the max batch limit, that is the amount of polygons a single mesh can be, is 64 000 triangles; Unity is +/- 52 000. What happens when you load in a object larger than this is that it will be one object with more than one mesh.

The amount of meshes you can have on screen at a time is decided by OpenGL or DirectX (DirectX can have up to 50 more) and your graphics card. The amount for the mid range PC is 300-350 at the moment.

That means that Unreal can render up to 22400 triangles of static meshes with the basic shader, on screen and keep above 60 frames per second, on a mid range PC.

If 22400 triangles sound low then consider that the mid range screen size is 1600*900, that is about one polygon for each 64 pixels on screen.

Another question I asked myself as I was learning from videos and courses. Sometimes when I watch someone build an environment scene in a game engine like Unreal, Unity or Cry, they use two different approaches or a mix of them. One group works with a lot of building blocks like single walls to build a whole house, or single head sized stones to build a small wall out of them. Or they use models of single wood planks, stick them together and build a wood wall/roof/floor like this. Other people just have the whole thing modeled beforehand in a modeling software and just insert the whole building to the scene.

This depends on how the assets where made.

Set pieces are things like walls and doors, they are things that will appear in the scene multiple times. Set pieces work like Lego blocks, your level designer gets a bunch of them and then builds every thing from them.

This has some huge performance benefits and production benefits. This is also the preferred way of working in Unreal as unreal uses instances, meaning that if you made one crate or made a create out of 10 pieces of wood instances it will have the same performance.

This is because unreal batches draw calls based on materials, that however means that if each piece of wood had it’s own material they would be more costly- than one crate with one material- if they didn’t shared the same material.

You will want to lookup “Environment creation for games” to understand how set pieces work.

The single object approach is used when making a piece that will only appear at one point in the game, these are usually key game elements.

Because these kind of models use special textures only meant for them, it’s harder to reuse the resources and you would need more models and textures to make scenes.

The upside to using this technique is that the object can have more details and will look more real than one assembled from other model parts.

Fallout 4 allows players to use the set pieces to build, the difference is that the level designer isn’t bound by the same rules as the players.

edit: Most Tutorials are focused on a single model, a key piece. Most courses are based around a set, because they have more time.

A full set takes a weak on average to make.





” alt=”kburkhart84″ itemprop=”image”>

September 21, 2016 10:31 PM

One thing I should mention, about low-poly and high-poly, which comes first is all about preference. Some people prefer to sculpt out the high poly version, and then do retopo to get the low poly. Others make the low poly, and then do the subdivision(or whatever method to get the needed geometry) to be able to sculpt the high poly. Either works. Another thing to consider, especially if you are working alone, is that you may not need to mess with low/high poly. Some people make just the low poly version, and then they create textures in something like Substance Painter. The beauty of Painter is that you paint all the maps of the material at once. If using the PBR pipeline, this means it paints the Albedo, Metallic, Normal, Rough/Gloss, all at once. So if you are painting with a material that has heights/normals as part of it, then you are adding the normals right there as part of the process, and without having pre-sculpted them first. You can even directly “sculpt” normal maps in as well simply be painting on that channel alone, though it is best to paint whole materials when possible.

The other thing…some people prefer modular design(making pieces of levels, then putting them together later), while others prefer to model whole levels. The advantage of making modular pieces is that once they are done, if they are done right, you can make big levels with small pieces, and if you change a piece, it can apply everywhere it was repeated to. The disadvantage is that you have to make them right so that they fit together, and the fact is that they can get repetitive if there isn’t enough variety. The advantage of modelling it all at once is that you can make the variety automatically as part of the progress. The disadvantage is that it generally takes longer to make a level in the modelling software, at least, a complete level. If you have modular pieces, you can move them(export) to the engine as you get them so that the level designer can start right then. But if you are making whole levels at a time, it isn’t so easy to do that all at once. So basically, there are advantages and disadvantages to both methods.


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3D Art, psychedelic dome, outdoor cinema: What’s On at Southport Festival 2016 https://arkenyon.com/3d-art-psychedelic-dome-outdoor-cinema-whats-on-at-southport-festival-2016/ https://arkenyon.com/3d-art-psychedelic-dome-outdoor-cinema-whats-on-at-southport-festival-2016/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:38:10 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/?p=219 A huge psychedelic outdoor dome, 3D pavement art, acclaimed poet Simon Armitage, a beach festival, a Minions movie screened in outdoor cinema, comedian Mark Watson – there is a huge variety of attractions taking place in the first ever Southport Festival. The showcase takes place at venues across the town between Friday, May 6 and […]]]>

A huge psychedelic outdoor dome, 3D pavement art, acclaimed poet Simon Armitage, a beach festival, a Minions movie screened in outdoor cinema, comedian Mark Watson – there is a huge variety of attractions taking place in the first ever Southport Festival.

The showcase takes place at venues across the town between Friday, May 6 and Sunday, May 8.

There promises to be something for everyone with music, poetry, visual arts, literature and comedy – with many of the events free.

The fun is being organised by Southport Business Improvement District and Sefton Council.

Friday, May 6:



Psychedelic dome to be built in Southport’s Town Gardens as part of Southport Festival

Jellyfish Moon

Lord Street, Southport

Friday until Sunday

10am-7pm each hour

Tickets can be purchased on the day for a nominal charge

visit southportfestival.com for more details.

Jellyfish Moon bring Audio Sonic Vision to the Southport Festival.

A digitally animated journey has been scored by the Constellations Collective and is an acoustic-architectural space created as an audio visual installation, a 10m geodesic event dome.

360 degree projections in the dome, with music that is a clear representation of the images being shown will immerse the audience in a way never felt before.

Matt Goodfellow

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

10:30am-11:45am.

01704 533333

Free – Booking is essential

Performance Poet – Matt is a poet and primary school teacher from Manchester.

His poems have been published in magazines and anthologies worldwide.

Since embarking on his poetry career, Matt’s high-energy performances and workshops have delighted, excited and enthused thousands of children in schools and libraries.

Watercolour Painting Demonstration

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

11am-1pm.

01704 533333

Free

Come along and pick up some hints and tips from some of SCAs Watercolour painters.

Felting ‘have a go’sessions

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

2pm-4pm

01704 533333

Free

Join in the fun of making your own Felted piece of artwork.



Author Carys Bray

Meet the Author – Carys Bray

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

2pm-4pm

01704 533333

Free

Author Talk, questions – book signing.

Carys Bray’s debut collection Sweet Home won the Scott prize and selected stories were broadcast on BBC Radio

Four Extra. Her first novel A Song for Issy Bradley was serialised on BBC Radio Four’s Book at Bedtime and was shortlisted for the Costa Book Awards.

It won the Utah Book Award and the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award and was selected for the 2015 Richard and Judy Summer Book Club.

Carys lives in Southport with her husband and four children.

Her second novel The Museum of You will be published in June 2016. She is working on a third novel.



Poet Tony Harrison

Tony Harrison

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

5pm

01704 533333

£10 plus booking fee

theatkinson.co.uk

Acclaimed for his extraordinary formal brilliance and technique, Southport Festival is proud to present a teatime special poetry reading by the world renowned poet Tony Harrison.

Said by several critics and reviewers to be confrontational, celebratory, tender, brilliant – Tony Harrison’s work has been wide-ranging and has had massive impact.

Commonly acknowledged as one of the most significant British poets of the late 20th century, he has built an impressive oeuvre which encompasses poetry for books and newspapers, for theatre and opera and for film and television.

Winner of several literary prizes and the author of books, plays and translations too numerous to list.

Acclaimed for his extraordinary formal brilliance and technique, Harrison has famously said that ‘poetry is all I write, whether for books or readings, or for the National Theatre, or for the opera-house and concert hall, or even for TV. All these activities are part of the same quest for public poetry.’

Anthony Ormesher Duo

A Great Little Place, Hoghton Street, Southport

6pm

01704 532066

Free to diners

Tony’s first venture into music was playing guitar in a dance band in the 50’s, his liking for jazz came from listening to such greats as Django Reinhardt, Barny Kessel and Ted Farlow, he also had a liking for the music of The Original Dixieland Jazz Band.

Anthony Ormesher is a Liverpool-born guitarist who, in 1993 at the age of 12, won the Daily Telegraph Young Jazz Musician of the Year award.

After finishing as runner up in the Young Jazz Musician of the Year regional finals in 1997, he went on to study jazz at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London.

Subhuman Race

Fox & Goose, Cable Street, Southport

7pm

01704 539552

£5 in advance / £7 on the door

Subhuman Race, the uk’s No 1 skidrow tribute band with support from Bullet Proof Rose plus DJ till 2.30am.

Book tickets via southportfestival.com

Rioghnach Connolly & Ellis Davies

Wilsons Kitchen, Lord Street, Southport

7.30pm

01704 546163

Free to diners

Armagh born singer and flautist Rioghnach’s music has strong folk roots coming from a Sean-nós background and delivered with her resonant, powerful voice and stirring in elements of Appalachia, Blues and Jazz, the overall performance is energizing, happy and upbeat.

Arden Rockers

Arden Café, Eastbank Street, Southport

7.30pm

01704 534433

Free

Arden Rockers are from a specialist College and have been together for two years. They play their own instruments and sing. They have performed at the Everyman Theatre in Liverpool for DaDaFest and are going to play at the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall in July.



Dean Stansby

Dean Stansby

R Italian Diner, Ocean Plaza, Southport

7.45pm

01704 530077

Free to diners

Dean Stansby is an accomplished piano vocalist, and has performed at many prestigious events across the world, most recently performing alongside West-end Stars, and comedians John Bishop and Ricky Tomlinson.

Throughout the year Dean can be seen on board various luxury cruise liners, touring with his headline show, The Piano Man.

In Dean’s career there have been many highlights including supporting Westlife on their UK Arena “The love Tour” where he performed for thousands at venues such as Wembley Arena.

Dean is renowned for his exceptional performances; paying tribute to the sounds of Swing, Pop, Soul and Motown.

Rae Owens

Pizzeria Mamma Mia Lord Street, Southport

8pm

01704 540259

Free to diners

Rae Owens played guitar from an early age and started singing much later.

After a time playing in a variety of bands, he played clubs as a solo act.

On returning to UK in the 80’s started playing bass and sousa in jazz bands. He currently plays bass with The Chicago Teddybears as well as performing solo or with his own small bands.



Comedian Mark Watson

Mark Watson

I’m Not Here

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

8pm

01704 533333

£17 plus booking fee

Ages 14+

theatkinson.co.uk

Mark Watson (multi-award-winning star of numerous TV shows including Dave’s Road to Rio, BBC’s We Need Answers, Live At The Apollo, Mock The Week and Have I Got News For You, and his own cult Radio 4 series Mark Watson Makes The World Substantially Better and Mark Watson Talks A Bit About Life) returns with the follow-up show to his highly celebrated and successful ‘Flaws’.



Dylan Thomas. Photo: BBC/PA Wire

Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

8pm

01704 533333

£10 plus booking fee

theatkinson.co.uk

To begin at the beginning. It is a moonless night in the small town….. join us for a celebration of Dylan Thomas’ great work.

Set in a fictional fishing village and focusing on 24 hours in the life of its residents.

Under Milk Wood has become an international phenomenon since it premiered just weeks before Thomas’s untimely death in 1953.

Gambolling Arena Theatre Company, in association with Edda Arts, brings to life this extraordinary tale in an evening of magical prose and bitter-sweet atmosphere.

Luke Grey

El Rincon Bodega, Eastbank Square, Lord Street, Southport

8.30pm

01704 53000

Free – menu available

Luke plays piano / keyboards & his jazz vocals are a real treat!

Louis Louis Louis

The Sandgrounder, Lord Street, Southport

8.30pm

01704 549271

Free – pub menu available

Red hot rhythm ‘n’ blues, jump jive and a touch of ska. Louis Louis Louis formed in Leeds five years ago, and play a blend of old and original rhythm ‘n’ blues, jump jive, and ska in a rowdy good-time fashion. Expect thumpin’ slap bass, honkin’ horns, raucous four-part vocal harmonies and a driving piano boogie.

Higher Ground

The Victoria, Promenade, Southport

8.30pm

01704 544121

Free

Higher Ground are a North West based three piece band with bags of style.

Their innovative covers of a wide range of material will suit all tastes. Whether it’s Motown, soul or pop that take your fancy, you are sure to have a fabulous evening with their extensive repertoire.

Kyla Brox Duo

The Coronation, King Street, Southport

9pm

01704 530611

Free

Kyla Brox and her music/life partner Danny Blomeley first worked together in ‘The child slavery band’ of Kyla’s legendary father, blues singer Victor Brox.

Kyla was a mature 13 and Danny was, well, 13. Throw Away Your Blues, their sixth studio album and first in seven years, teaches important lessons about the demands of the busy workday, the lack of time in the modern world, the pull of home vs the call of the road, and how to keep it real with good humour and lots of soul.

Kyla is a temptress, diva, tear provoker and the most consummate blues singer of her generation.



Happy Daze will play at The Phoenix, Coronation Walk, Southport, on Friday, May 6

Happy Daze

The Phoenix, Coronation Walk, Southport

9pm

Live At The Phoenix

01704 513233

Saturday May 7



The cast of the recent Dick Whittington family pantomime at Southport Little Theatre, on Hoghton Street, Southport

It’s Behind You!

Southport Little Theatre, Hoghton Street, Southport.

10am-11am

Free

Come & discover how The Little Theatre Wardrobe department designs and creates costumes for their ever popular pantomimes.

This a rare opportunity to peek into the hidden creative world behind the scenes.

From Page to Stage Youth Drama Workshop

Southport Little Theatre, Hoghton Street, Southport

10am

Free

Take part in an exciting performance workshop where a classic tale will be recreated in just 60 minutes.

Suitable for 13-18 year olds please note spaces limited.



Carve Up The Coast events take place during the 2016 Southport Festival. Photo by Tim Cullen Photography

Carve Up The Coast

Princes Park, Southport

Start 10am

Quick Carve Auction 1:45pm

Grand Auction 4:45pm

Free

Come and experience the exhilaration of watching some of the UK’s professional exhibition Chainsaw Carvers, creating works of art before your eyes.

Carvers will race against the clock to create a large scale wood sculpture in just four hours.

After a short break, to catch their breath, they will compete in a 30 minute speed – carve to produce smaller equally stunning pieces.



Big Board Event Cartoons takes place on Chapel Street in Southport as part of the 2016 Southport Festival on Saturday, May 7 Photo by Brendan Riley

Big Board Event Cartoons

Chapel Street, Southport

10.30am-4pm

01704 533333

Free

Drawing live on giant boards in the town centre, five of the best cartoon artists will be basing their gag cartoons on one of the successful annual events here in Southport, such as the Flower Show, ir Show, Comedy Festival..

Also make sure you look out for some of Britain’s top caricaturists, who will be dotted around the town centre capturing anyone brave enough to sit and be ‘done’!



Puppeteer and storyteller Ruthie Boycott Garnett

Ruthie Boycott Garnett

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

10.30am

01704 533333

Free (booking essential)

Puppet making session and story time.

Join Ruthie, former young storyteller of the year, making puppets.

The puppets will then be used to create a magical story.

Costume Drama

Southport Little Theatre, Hoghton Street, Southport.

11am

01704 530521 / 530460

Free

The Southport Little Theatre wardrobe department present a parade of costumes which have featured in their productions over the years.



Spectacular 3D pavement art is coming to the town as part of the Southport festival.

‘What’s going on down there?’

Nevill Street, Southport

11am-3pm

Free

Street Art event exploring the possibilities of what might be hidden under our streets.

Internationally acclaimed artist of many styles, ‘Replete’, has been invited to create a unique piece of artwork giving us his thoughts on what might be hidden under one of Southport’s oldest resort streets.

Replete will be joined by other artists creating street artwork and you can join in the fun too, by coming along and taking part with your own ideas.



Paul Wilkinson played the dame in the SDC Sleeping Beauty pantomime in 2015 at Southport Little Theatre

Dressing Up Selfie Session

Southport Little Theatre, Hoghton Street, Southport

11am-miday and 2pm-3pm

01704 530521 / 530460

Free

A chance to try on different hats and costumes & take a selfie.

Your Facebook page will never be the same again!

Little Theatre Tours

Southport Little Theatre, Hoghton Street, Southport

11am-midday and 3pm-3.30pm

01704 530521 / 530460

Free

Get a peek behind the scenes and meet some of the characters involved in putting on a production for The Southport Dramatic Club.

If you’re lucky this may include our resident ghost – Claude.



Enjoy a Carve Up The Coast Childrens make & craft session as part of Southport Festival Photo by Tim Cullen Photography

Carve Up The Coast Children’s ‘make & craft’ session

Princes Park, Southport

11am-3pm

Free

Make and craft session with lots of crafting fun.

Carve Up The Coast Raku Ceramics ‘have a go’ session

Princes Park,Southport

11am-2pm

£3.50 per pot

Come and have a go at making and firing your own ceramic bowl.

Carve Up The Coast Felting ‘have a go’ session

Princes Park, Southport

Midday-2pm

Free

Make your own felted piece of artwork.



Enjoy the Wesley Street Festival as part of Southport Festival 2016. Photo by Diana Celine Photography

Wesley Street Festival

Wesley Street, Southport

Midday-4pm

Free

Wesley Street, affectionately known as “a Village in the Town” is running its 6th Annual Wesley Street Festival in conjunction with the Southport Festival.

This year we have exciting plans to bring the beach to the street making it “a Beach in the Town”.

The festival has grown in popularity year on year and people look forward to the event.

It’s a family orientated event with sandcastle building, Punch and Judy, flag making, dance workshops, music, morris dancing and other surprises!

Midday-4pm.

Southbound Attic Band

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

Noon

01704 533333

Free

The Southbound Attic Band is singer songwriter Barry Jones and Ronnie Clark.

Their guitar, harmonica, bass and vocal harmony combination create Celtic flavoured acoustic Americana with an English folk rock sensibility and catchy melodic songs with a dark edge.

Carve Up The Coast – Bodging Demonstration

Wesley Street, Southport

Midday-3pm

Free

Become inspired to work with wood art

Pete Rimmer and Bill Hackney

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

12.50pm

01704 533333

Free

theatkinson.co.uk

Regulars at the Bothy Folk Club and Tap and Bottles. Great guitar playing and interesting arrangement of folk and blues old and new.

Catherine Wheels Theatre Company



The Story of the Little Gentleman is performed at The Atkinson in Southport on Saturday May 7 as part of Southport Festival 2016

The Story of the Little Gentlemen

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

1pm and 3pm

01704 533333

£8 Adult / £6 children / £24 family, plus booking fee

theatkinson.co.uk

The Story of the Little Gentleman is a beautiful, funny and moving story about the power of friendship.

“Will you be my friend?” All the Little Gentleman wants is a friend… A friend he can sit in the sun with and listen to the birds. A friend to walk with and share his cookies.

But nobody seems to like the Little Gentleman and nobody wants to be his friend.

The Little Gentleman thinks he will live a sad and lonely life forever…

Until one day he is woken up by a curious dog who just wants to play.

An energetic two-hander with an original score by Danny Krass and design by Karen Tennent, this is a playful celebration of friendship and acceptance.

Matt Holborn Quartet

Wayfarers Arcade, Lord Street Southport

1pm

01704 539077

Free

Recent graduates from LCoM inspired by the music and legacy of Django Reinhardt, and with a love of anything that swings: fun, new and exciting whilst still maintaining its hot club traditions.



Sir Antony Gormley pictured with one of his famous ‘Iron Men’ at the launch of Another Place in summer 2005.

Another Place: Another View

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

1.15pm

01704 533333

Free

Giving voices to Gormley’s ‘Iron Men’

A special screening of the DVD Another Place: Another View. Produced on Merseyside by Driftwood and Associated Islands Music and featuring Poems by Brian Wake with music and images by Dennis Conroy and Rob Shepley.

Two Blank Pages

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

1.40pm

01704 533333

Free

Two Blank Pages is a band based in both London and Shrewsbury with a wide range of musical influences.

They write much of their own material with an emphasis on liveliness and humour.

Their live shows are where their focus lies, attempting to entertain any and all audiences.

If you enjoy bad puns, awkward moments and appalling dance moves then this is the band to see!

Carve Up The Coast

Weaving ‘have a go’ session

Princes Park,Southport

2pm-4pm

Free

A great chance to try out Pegloom and Frame weaving.

Modjango

A Great Little Place, Hoghton Street, Southport

2pm

01704 532066

Free to diners

Modjango consists of Paul and Roy Gregory who, individually and as a duo, are rated as, and have played with, some of the best musicians in the world.

Blending the Jazz Manouche (Gypsy Jazz) Guitar style of Django Reinhardt with Contemporary Jazz Guitar, Latin / Spanish Guitar, and many others, Modjango continue to improve the diversity, vibrance and ingenuity of their sets, whether as a duo or as part of a larger outfit.



Liverpool poet Levi Tafari

An Afternoon with the Poets

Deryn Rees-Jones, Levi Tafari, Emily Berry

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

2pm

01704 533333

£7.50 plus booking fee

Deryn Rees-Jones is Professor of Poetry at the University of Liverpool. She collaborates frequently with artists, and is currently writing a critical book on the work of the artist Paula Rego.

She edits the new Pavilion Poetry series for Liverpool University Press, and co-directs the Centre for New and International Writing.

Emily Berry’s first book of poems is Dear Boy, which won the Forward Prize for Best First Collection and the Hawthornden Prize. She is a contributor to The Breakfast Bible (a compendium of breakfasts) and editor of Best British Poetry 2015 (Salt Publishing)

Levi Tafari, hugely popular poet, playwright and performer, was born and raised in Liverpool by his Jamaican parents. He began performing and publishing his poems in the 1980s and is the author of four poetry collections including Duboetry (1987), Liverpool Experience (1989), Rhyme Don’t Pay (1998) and From the Page to the Stage (2006).

His plays have been performed at The Unity Theatre and the Liverpool Playhouse.

Sefton Youth Jazz Orchestra

Christ Church, Lord Street, Southport

2.30pm

01704 531756

Free

The Sefton Youth Jazz Orchestra is the senior jazz ensemble of the Music Service and although open to all students within the borough most are taught by the Music Service tutors in Sefton schools.

It aims to develop the students interest in jazz and actively encourages improvisation – an essential element of jazz.

They play a wide variety of styles from the swinging days of the big band era right up to the present day with music by Gordon Goodwin.

The band focuses mainly on instrumental pieces but also features some excellent young vocalists performing well known big band standards.

The Huers

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

2.40pm

01704 533333

Free

Ian Cleverdon and Phil Caffery play all types of roots and folk music, they are one of the most popular acts from the North West of England. They have played venues all over the country and have built up a great reputation.



Ladies Barbershop Chorus, Just Voices

Just Voices

Christ Church, Lord Street, Southport

3.45pm

01705 531756

Free

Multi- award winning Ladies Barbershop Chorus, Just Voices, will delight even the most discerning of audiences. Under the direction of Sharon King, listen to marvel of acappella four part harmony singing and be entertained with a varied repertoire of songs from pop, jazz, traditional, gospel and so much more.

Just Voices are delighted to have been asked to be part this year’s Southport Music and Arts Festival and hope to see many new and known faces supporting the event.

The Rag Tag Misfits

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

3.50pm

01704 533333

Free

The Rag Tag Misfits are well known travelling troubadours, captivating audiences worldwide with percussive foot stomping music, heartfelt lyrics on life, and how it is, inspired by life on the road.

A great chance to see them in concert.

Vuosaaren Musiikkikoulu Helsinki

Southport String Ensemble

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

4pm

01704 533333

Free

Young String Players from Southport & Helsinki come together to bring you an exciting programme of Classical and Folk Music from Finland and the UK.Musicians from Vuosaaren Musiikkikoulu are visiting Southport by invitation from Southport String Ensemble.

The two groups met for a lively music making session in Vuosaari, Helsinki in August 2015 when Southport Strings were on Tour in Finland.

The meeting was instigated by Sarah Marks (Southport Strings/Gallimaufry) and Aliina Jarvela (Vuosaaren Musiikkikoulu/Frigg) to promote a cultural exchange beween the young people of Southport and Helsinki.

Two Blank Pages

Tap & Bottles, Cambridge Walks, Southport

7pm

07908 040013

Free

Two Blank Pages is a band based in both London and Shrewsbury with a wide range of musical influences. They write much of their own material with an emphasis on liveliness and humour.

Their live shows are where their focus lies, attempting to entertain any and all audiences. If you enjoy bad puns, awkward moments and appalling dance moves then this is the band to see!



Pink Floyd tribute band Pink Floydian will perform at the Fox & Goose pub in Southport

Pink Floydian

Fox & Goose, Cable Street, Southport

7pm

01704 539552

£6 in advance / £8 on the door

Pink Floyd 8 piece tribute band.

Book tickets via southportfestival.com

Modjango

Wilsons Kitchen, Lord St, Southport

7.30pm

01704 546163

Free to diners

Modjango consists of Paul and Roy Gregory who, individually and as a duo, are rated as, and have played with, some of the best musicians in the world.

Dervish

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

7.30pm

Telephone: 01704 533333

£16, plus booking fee

theatkinson.co.uk

It is not without good reason that Dervish have become one of Ireland’s most enduring bands – whether representing Celtic music at major festivals, playing at The Great Wall of China or setting the room ablaze in the US on St Patrick’s Day, Dervish are as complete a band as are to be found anywhere within the tradition, with one of the most distinctive, yet expertly balanced sounds to be heard anywhere in traditional music.

Marrakesh Express

Lords Café Bar, Lord Street, Southport

8pm

01704 543814

Free

Marrakesh Express are a fantastically entertaining duo with broad appeal singing hits from The Monkees, Simon and Garfunkel all the way through to Paolo Nutini.

Catch them early for some laid back and relaxed entertainment, stick around and they will have you singing and dancing to all your favorite songs. A class act not to be missed.

Swingology

The Sandgrounder, Lord Street, Southport

8.30pm

01704 549271

Free – Pub menu available

Swingology were formed in 2005 by 5 musicians based in Crosby, Liverpool, to play the toe-tapping music known as Gypsy Jazz.

This style became famous in the 1930s and 1940s, popularised by the great Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli, The band not only plays all the Gypsy Jazz standards, but a range of popular Jazz classics and

some modern songs in the classic Swing Manouche style (the original term used for Gypsy Jazz).

Charlotte Holroyd

El Rincon Bodega, Eastbank Square, Lord Street, Southport

8.30pm

01704 530002

Free – Menu available

Charlotte is a vibrant sax player from Manchester. After gaining a first class honours degree from Paul McCartney’s prestigious Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts she has worked professionally playing solo and in bands around the country. She has toured the UK, recorded a music video, appeared on the radio and performed at festivals including Manchester International Festival, In the City showcase and The Royal Television Awards. Her playing is soulful and modern and never fails to get rave reviews from impressed audience members!



The Minions Movie

Outdoor Cinema – Minions

Lower Promenade, Kings Gardens, Southport

8.40pm

Free (£2 donation to Friends of King’s Gardens welcomed)

Bring a picnic Tea and enjoy the outdoor cinema ‘Minions’.

The Paul Farr Band

The Coronation, King Street, Southport

9pm

01704 530611

Free

The Paul Farr Band are a Manchester based outfit playing original music taking influences from jazz, blues, funk and a splash of filmscape for good measure.

They have one album (‘Thinking Big’) under their belt and a second in the pipe line. Although very much a part of the Manchester jazz scene, they have considerable success individually as session players for artists such as Lily Allen, Tom Jones, Corinne Bailey-Rae, Cinematic Orchestra, and many more.

Sunday, May 8

Pottery Experience

Princess Diana Gardens, Southport

11am-3pm

Free

Come along with the family and enjoy this pottery experience, you can have a go or watch it being done.

Trio Gitan – The Stephane Grappelli Story

Wayfarers Arcade, Lord Street Southport

1pm

01704 539077

Free

The Stephane Grappelli story featuring the Andy Lawrenson trio has made a bold and adventurous tribute to the life and music of the great musician.

Using the framework of his life story, from early days of grinding poverty, playing in the streets and courtyards of Paris, through his famed partnership with the great gypsy guitarist, Django Reinhardt, to international acclaim in his own right in his later years with frequent concerts and TV appearances throughout the 1970s and 80s and a Grammy lifetime achievement awarded just after his death in 1997.

Funny, sad, poignant and vibrant, this show entertains and enchants music lovers of all ages. A moving, enjoyable and memorable night’s entertainment.

Ellie Coast

El Rincon Bodega, Eastbank Square, Lord Street, Southport

2pm-3.45pm

01704 530002

Free – Menu Available

Afternoon Tea in the Gallery: The John Hallam Trio

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

1.30pm

01704 533333

£17, plus booking fee

Jazz in the afternoon is set in a beautiful Gallery and comes with a homemade afternoon tea.

John Hallam is a virtuoso clarinettist and reeds specialist whose clarinet playing draws inspiration from Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Acker Bilk, whilst on saxophone he cites Lester Young, Stan Getz and Gerry Mulligan as just a few of his influences. Having worked alongside many of the greats, John’s playing is imbued with the rich history of jazz and resonates strongly with audiences wherever he appears.

Jacqui’s Rhythm Katz

Ramada Plaza Southport – Marine Suite, Promenade, Southport

3pm

01704 516220

Free

Jacqui’s Rhythm Katz is a nine piece swing band with horn section, rhythm section, male and female vocalists.

The band plays a wide variety of favourite tunes from the swing era, Latin American, pop and modern classics.

Featuring music from the great band leaders Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Sammy Nestico, as well as more modern arrangers. Our male vocalist sings the songs of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Michael Buble, Paul Anka to name a few. Whilst our female vocalist sings numbers made famous by Dinah Washington, Nina Simone, Ella Fitzgerald to more modern vocalists such as Norah Jones, Adele and Amy Winehouse.

Anthony Ormesher Duo

Lords Café Bar, Lord Street, Southport

3pm

01704 543814

Free

Tony’s first venture into music was playing guitar in a dance band in the 50s, his liking for jazz came from listening to such greats as Django Reinhardt, Barny Kessel and Ted Farlow, he also had a liking for the music of The Original Dixieland Jazz Band. Anthony Ormesher is a Liverpool-born guitarist who, in 1993 at the age of 12, won the Daily Telegraph Young Jazz Musician of the Year award. After finishing as runner up in the Young Jazz Musician of the Year regional finals in 1997, he went on to study jazz at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London.

Rae Owens Duo

Tap and Bottles, Cambridge Walks, Chapel Street, Southport

3pm

07908 040013

Free

Rae Owens played guitar from an early age and started singing much later. After a time playing in a variety of bands, he played clubs as a solo act. On returning to UK in the 80’s started playing bass and sousa in jazz bands. He currently plays bass with The Chicago Teddybears as well as performing solo or with his own small bands.



Poet Simon Armitage

Simon Armitage

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

7.30pm

01704 533333

£12 plus booking fee

theatkinson.co.uk

One of the nation’s best known, best loved and most popular poets, Simon Armitage has published more than a dozen collections of poetry, most recently Seeing Stars (2010) and Paper Aeroplane (2014).

His translations of medieval verse include his acclaimed Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (2006).

Armitage’s poems have been part of GCSE and A Level exams for almost two decades. He is also the author of two novels and three best-selling non-fiction titles, All Points North, Walking Home and Walking Away.

The latter recounts his experiences of walking the Pennine Way and SW Coast Path as a modern day troubadour giving poetry readings en route, singing, as it were, for his supper at inns and hostelries along the way.

Armitage’s extensive writing for TV and radio includes the Bafta-winning Feltham Sings for which he received a nIvor Novello Award for song-writing, his BBC2 documentary The Great War: An Elegy and the recent BBC4 drama-documentary Black Roses: the Killing of Sophie Lancaster.

Big Draw on the Beach – Family Event

Southport Beach (next to the Pier)

3pm-5pm

Free

Come down to the beach and help Artist Sarah Jane Richardson and the team, create a gigantic Festival drawing celebrating our fabulous coastline and its inhabitants.



Comedian Sean Percival

Big Comedy Show

Fox & Goose, 8 Cable Street, Southport

8pm

0151 709 4321

bigcomedyuk.com

£10

Big Comedy is the driving force behind the highly successful annual Southport Comedy Festival.

Come and join Bren Riley as he introduces two of the best comedians off the international comedy circuit: Sean Percival and Chris McCausland.

The Modern Vintage Swing Band

The Victoria, Promenade, Southport

8.30pm

01704 543814

Free

The Modern Vintage Swing Band take great songs and give them a makeover.

The audience will be blown away by the creativity and style of the band. Modern pop hits done in a vintage style by some of the UK’s very best musicians!

The Fringe – Beyond The Festival



Southport’s Waterfront Arts Project (L-R: Joan Walmsley, Harry Kessler, Tony Wynne, Brenda Porter and Suzy Walker.)

Elements Exhibition

Waterfront Arts Project, Waterfront Plaza, Promenade, Southport

10am-4.30pm (Mon-Sat) & 11am-4pm (Sun)

The word ‘element’ has many diverse meanings. It is the essential or characteristic part of something abstract, a small but significant amount of a feeling, a chemical substance that cannot be broken down into simpler substances or the essence of eastern philosophies.

That diversity of meaning is reflected in ‘Elements’ by the individual artist language and the chosen media of the exhibitors. Exploring the notion of the ‘element’ in paint, sculpture, photography and other media the artists deal with both literal and obscure concepts.

This is the Waterfront Arts Project’s first major new exhibition since its reopening in March 2016.



Noel Coward’s ‘Tonight at 8.30’

Southport Little Theatre, Hoghton Street, Southport

6 May – 14 May

7.45pm

01704 530521 / 530460

Free

Two plays – one a sparkling comedy and the other the play that became the classic film ‘Brief Encounter’.

Southport Contemporary Arts – Photography Exhibition

A Great Little Place, Hoghton Street, Southport

Free

10am-4.30pm Mon to Sat and 11am-4pm Sun

Exhibition on throughout the Southport Festival

Victoria Dreamers

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport,

Mon-Sat 10am-4pm Sun 11am-4pm

Free

Drawn from our own outstanding collection of Victorian art, this exhibition looks at the themes of travel, storytelling, the antique past and nature. Many works have been recently restored and are exhibited for the first time in several decades.



A new major exhibition Lord Street: Past, Present and Future runs at The Atkinson in Southport until Sunday July 10, 2016

Lord Street: Past, Present & Future

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

Mon-Sat 10am-4pm Sun 11am-4pm

Free

01704 533333

Free

A celebration of Southport’s iconic shopping street, including photographs, architectural plans as well as costume and film, to explore the heritage and the people of Lord Street.

Derek Culley – The Landing

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport

Mon-Sat 10am-4pm Sun 11am-4pm

Free

01704 533333

Free

Southport’s new commercial gallery features an exhibition of work by Birkdale resident and Dublin born Derek Culley.

One Day, Something Happens: Paintings of People

The Atkinson, Lord Street, Southport,

Mon-Sat 10am-4pm Sun 11am-4pm

Free

01704 533333

Free

This exhibition looks at the everyday theatricality of the body and includes a selection of 20th century paintings by acclaimed artists such as Walter Sickert, Lucian Freud and David Hockney.

Sefton Artists

Wayfarers Arcade, Lord Street, Southport

Mon-Sat 10am-4:30pm and Sun 11am-4pm

Free

Sefton Artists are a group of popular local artists. Exhibiting successfully around Sefton for a number of years, they present their artwork in Wayfarers Arcade as part of the Southport Festival. Supporting Queenscourt Hospice.

Southport Contemporary Arts – Artists Exhibition

ArtHouse Gallery, Eastbank Street, Southport

11am-4pm

Free

Exhibition on throughout the Southport Festival

Southport Contemporary Arts – Textile Exhibition

Unit 12, Cambridge Walks, Eastbank Street, Southport

11am-4pm

Free

Exhibition on throughout the Southport Festival

Pier Bird Watch

Southport Pier

0151 934 2964

Free

Join us on the end of Southport Pier and watch the tide and the birds come in.

This weekend see’s some of the highest tides of the year – quite a spectacular site to see the waters swirling round the end of the pier, whilst at the same time this natural occurrence provides ideal opportunities to see the fantastic shore birdlife close up.

There will also be a display of a ’Flock’ of birds that were created by local communities last summer.

General Information

For general enquiries about the Southport Festival, visit southportfestival.com or email southportfestival@visitsouthport.com

Booking Fees

For events at The Atkinson a booking fee is £1 per ticket online/phone. A 2% credit card fee is charged for counter sales. For all other events, please check with the individual venue for booking fees.


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Saanich develops interactive 3D art in a bid to defeat pandemic blues – Saanich News https://arkenyon.com/saanich-develops-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-saanich-news/ https://arkenyon.com/saanich-develops-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-saanich-news/#respond Thu, 09 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/saanich-develops-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-saanich-news/ Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs. But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles. Locals might recognize Gillies […]]]>

Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs.

But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles.

Locals might recognize Gillies – from 2014 until the end of the event he participated in the Greater Victoria Chalk Art Festival. Until COVID-19 hit, he also participated in a similar event in Burnaby.

He failed to work in public until this summer when Saanich presented his public art program and he made two pieces, a fountain and pedestal in Cadboro-Gyro Park and the surf keyboard outside of the municipal hall.

Gilles – who owns and operates Azara Effect Productions, an animation, illustration and video production company – spent about 15 hours working on the eight-by-12-foot chalk work at the Town Hall.

He starts from a sketch on paper, then works on the concept, and of course, has a little back and forth with the neighborhood on what is doable, and suited to the space. Until a decade ago, work like this was prepared with pencil and paper, and while there are digital tools to speed up the process these days, there is still trial and error. .

“The way perspective works as things move away, crash and shrink,” he explained. “You have to be extremely biased. “

The musical note, for example, is stretched 10 to 12 times longer than if you looked down on it.

Everything is set ablaze at an angle from a specific point of view.

“When you walk around, everything immediately becomes skewed,” said the artist, whose first work was done in the Edmonton Oilers’ 2006 Stanley Cup race.

“I thought I should draw a Stanley Cup outside the Colosseum and distorted it to be an anamorphic 3D drawing but no one knew what it was.”

There is certainly some education required. Gillies will often add a sign, suggesting a camera or phone, and even paint a pair of feet for the best viewing experience.

“There is an awareness of 3D designs permeating the culture now, so people know where to stand,” he said.

One goal, and a big key to his work for those who create community arts for Saanich, is his attempt to create interactive art. He wants people to be part of the sculpture. With viewing through a camera, the work is of an Instagrammable quality.

“I really hope people are standing on the keyboard and taking a picture,” he said. “It’s an amazing thing when you can make adults be silly and have fun.”

This is the goal of the arts program in the community of Saanich, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has struck with its myriad of health and safety restrictions.

“It’s a really fun way to bring his art into the community, but also the way he treats his art invites you to be a part of it. By participating, it really comes to life, ”said Brenda Weatherston, community arts programmer for Saanich. “They are fun and playful and there is always something unexpected about them.”

Gillies is among the artists who create opportunities on a smaller scale and closer to home for people to engage in the arts openly. A recent open-air opera was also part of the program, with a few more still in the works.

To be continued on saanich.ca and the neighborhood social media platforms for other artistic activities.

c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

ArtSaanichVisual arts


Scott Gillies made this 3D chalk artwork outside Saanich Town Hall. (Photo from Colin factory)



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Saanich creates interactive 3D art in a bid to defeat pandemic blues – Vancouver Island Free Daily https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-vancouver-island-free-daily/ https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-vancouver-island-free-daily/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-vancouver-island-free-daily/ Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs. But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles. Locals might recognize Gillies […]]]>

Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs.

But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles.

Locals might recognize Gillies – from 2014 until the end of the event he participated in the Greater Victoria Chalk Art Festival. Until COVID-19 hit, he also participated in a similar event in Burnaby.

He failed to work in public until this summer when Saanich presented his public art program and he made two pieces, a fountain and pedestal in Cadboro-Gyro Park and the surf keyboard outside of the municipal hall.

Gilles – who owns and operates Azara Effect Productions, an animation, illustration and video production company – spent about 15 hours working on the eight-by-twelve chalk work at the Town Hall.

He starts from a sketch on paper, then works on the concept, and of course, has a little back and forth with the neighborhood on what is doable, and suited to the space. Until a decade ago, work like this was prepared with pencil and paper, and while there are digital tools to speed up the process these days, there is still trial and error. involved.

“The way perspective works as things move away, crash and shrink,” he explained. “You have to be extremely biased. “

The musical note, for example, is stretched 10 to 12 times longer than if you looked down on it.

Everything is set ablaze at an angle from a specific point of view.

“When you walk around, everything immediately becomes skewed,” said the artist, whose first work was done in the Edmonton Oilers’ 2006 Stanley Cup race.

“I thought I should draw a Stanley Cup outside the Colosseum and distorted it to be an anamorphic 3D drawing but no one knew what it was.”

There is certainly some education required. Gillies will often add a sign, suggesting a camera or phone, and even paint a pair of feet for the best viewing experience.

“There is an awareness of 3D designs permeating the culture now, so people know where to stand,” he said.

One goal, and a big key to his work for those who create community arts for Saanich, is his attempt to create interactive art. He wants people to be part of the sculpture. With viewing through a camera, the work is of an Instagrammable quality.

“I really hope people are standing on the keyboard and taking a picture,” he said. “It’s an amazing thing when you can make adults be silly and have fun.”

This is the goal of the arts program in the community of Saanich, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has struck with its myriad of health and safety restrictions.

“It’s a really fun way to bring his art into the community, but also the way he treats his art invites you to be a part of it. By participating, it really comes to life, ”said Brenda Weatherston, community arts programmer for Saanich. “They are fun and playful and there is always something unexpected about them.”

Gillies is among the artists who create opportunities on a smaller scale and closer to home for people to engage in the arts openly. A recent open-air opera was also part of the program, with a few more still in the works.

To be continued on saanich.ca and the neighborhood social media platforms for other artistic activities.

c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

ArtSaanichVisual arts


Scott Gillies made this 3D chalk artwork outside Saanich Town Hall. (Photo from Colin factory)



Source link

]]>
https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-vancouver-island-free-daily/feed/ 0
Saanich creates interactive 3D art in a bid to defeat pandemic blues – Victoria News https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-victoria-news/ https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-victoria-news/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/saanich-creates-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-victoria-news/ Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs. But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles. Locals might recognize Gillies […]]]>

Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs.

But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles.

Locals might recognize Gillies – from 2014 until the end of the event he participated in the Greater Victoria Chalk Art Festival. Until COVID-19 hit, he also participated in a similar event in Burnaby.

He failed to work in public until this summer when Saanich presented his public art program and he made two pieces, a fountain and pedestal in Cadboro-Gyro Park and the surf keyboard outside of the municipal hall.

Gilles – who owns and operates Azara Effect Productions, an animation, illustration and video production company – spent about 15 hours working on the eight-by-12-foot chalk work at the Town Hall.

He starts from a sketch on paper, then works on the concept, and of course, has a little back and forth with the neighborhood on what is doable, and suited to the space. Until a decade ago, work like this was prepared with pencil and paper, and while there are digital tools to speed up the process these days, there is still trial and error. .

“The way perspective works as things move away, crash and shrink,” he explained. “You have to be extremely biased. “

The musical note, for example, is stretched 10 to 12 times longer than if you looked down on it.

Everything is set ablaze at an angle from a specific point of view.

“When you walk around, everything immediately becomes skewed,” said the artist, whose first work was done in the Edmonton Oilers’ 2006 Stanley Cup race.

“I thought I should draw a Stanley Cup outside the Colosseum and distorted it to be an anamorphic 3D drawing but no one knew what it was.”

There is certainly some education required. Gillies will often add a sign, suggesting a camera or phone, and even paint a pair of feet for the best viewing experience.

“There is an awareness of 3D designs permeating the culture now, so people know where to stand,” he said.

One goal, and a big key to his work for those who create community arts for Saanich, is his attempt to create interactive art. He wants people to be part of the sculpture. With viewing through a camera, the work is of an Instagrammable quality.

“I really hope people are standing on the keyboard and taking a picture,” he said. “It’s an amazing thing when you can make adults be silly and have fun.”

This is the goal of the arts program in the community of Saanich, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has struck with its myriad of health and safety restrictions.

“It’s a really fun way to bring his art into the community, but also the way he treats his art invites you to be a part of it. By participating, it really comes to life, ”said Brenda Weatherston, community arts programmer for Saanich. “They are fun and playful and there is always something unexpected about them.”

Gillies is among the artists who create opportunities on a smaller scale and closer to home for people to engage in the arts openly. A recent open-air opera was also part of the program, with a few more still in the works.

To be continued on saanich.ca and the neighborhood social media platforms for other artistic activities.

c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca


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Scott Gillies made this 3D chalk artwork outside Saanich Town Hall. (Photo from Colin factory)



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Saanich develops interactive 3D art in a bid to defeat pandemic blues – Monday Magazine https://arkenyon.com/saanich-develops-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-monday-magazine/ https://arkenyon.com/saanich-develops-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-monday-magazine/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/saanich-develops-interactive-3d-art-in-a-bid-to-defeat-pandemic-blues-monday-magazine/ Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs. But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles. Locals might recognize Gillies […]]]>

Residents visiting the Saanich Municipal Hall may notice a giant chalk stain at the top of the concrete stairs.

But take the right angle and view it through a phone or camera, and the viewer witnesses the neighborhood’s latest piece of public art – a 3D chalk work by Scott Gilles.

Locals might recognize Gillies – from 2014 until the end of the event he participated in the Greater Victoria Chalk Art Festival. Until COVID-19 hit, he also participated in a similar event in Burnaby.

He failed to work in public until this summer when Saanich presented his public art program and he made two pieces, a fountain and pedestal in Cadboro-Gyro Park and the surf keyboard outside of the municipal hall.

Gilles – who owns and operates Azara Effect Productions, an animation, illustration and video production company – spent about 15 hours working on the eight-by-12-foot chalk work at the Town Hall.

He starts from a sketch on paper, then works on the concept, and of course, has a little back and forth with the neighborhood on what is doable, and suited to the space. Until a decade ago, work like this was prepared with pencil and paper, and while there are digital tools to speed up the process these days, there is still trial and error. .

“The way perspective works as things move away, crash and shrink,” he explained. “You have to be extremely biased. “

The musical note, for example, is stretched 10 to 12 times longer than if you looked down on it.

Everything is set ablaze at an angle from a specific point of view.

“When you walk around, everything immediately becomes skewed,” said the artist, whose first work was done in the Edmonton Oilers’ 2006 Stanley Cup race.

“I thought I should draw a Stanley Cup outside the Colosseum and distorted it to be an anamorphic 3D drawing but no one knew what it was.”

There is certainly some education required. Gillies will often add a sign, suggesting a camera or phone, and even paint a pair of feet for the best viewing experience.

“There is an awareness of 3D designs permeating the culture now, so people know where to stand,” he said.

One goal, and a big key to his work for those who create community arts for Saanich, is his attempt to create interactive art. He wants people to be part of the sculpture. With viewing through a camera, the work is of an Instagrammable quality.

“I really hope people are standing on the keyboard and taking a picture,” he said. “It’s an amazing thing when you can make adults be silly and have fun.”

This is the goal of the arts program in the community of Saanich, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has struck with its myriad of health and safety restrictions.

“It’s a really fun way to bring his art into the community, but also the way he treats his art invites you to be a part of it. By participating, it really comes to life, ”said Brenda Weatherston, community arts programmer for Saanich. “They are fun and playful and there is always something unexpected about them.”

Gillies is among the artists who create opportunities on a smaller scale and closer to home for people to engage in the arts openly. A recent open-air opera was also part of the program, with a few more still in the works.

To be continued on saanich.ca and the neighborhood social media platforms for other artistic activities.

c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and like us on Facebook.

ArtSaanichVisual arts


Scott Gillies made this 3D chalk artwork outside Saanich Town Hall. (Photo from Colin factory)



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Le Havre high school students create 3D art in the midst of the pandemic https://arkenyon.com/le-havre-high-school-students-create-3d-art-in-the-midst-of-the-pandemic/ https://arkenyon.com/le-havre-high-school-students-create-3d-art-in-the-midst-of-the-pandemic/#respond Fri, 02 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/le-havre-high-school-students-create-3d-art-in-the-midst-of-the-pandemic/ Students at Havre High School are creating three-dimensional art this term, a change made necessary by the COVID-19 pandemic. Students create sculptures of all kinds, but the most common among them are animals, mythical and otherwise, as well as heroes and villains of modern and ancient media. Kendall Griggs, an art teacher at Havre High […]]]>

Students at Havre High School are creating three-dimensional art this term, a change made necessary by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students create sculptures of all kinds, but the most common among them are animals, mythical and otherwise, as well as heroes and villains of modern and ancient media.

Kendall Griggs, an art teacher at Havre High School, is overseeing the projects and said the students create the bases for their sculptures from wire, foil and cardboard, which will be covered with clay paper mache based which can be sanded and painted.

Some students are still building their bases while others are now applying clay.

Griggs said students would normally be working on glass mosaics around this time of year, but he and his students found shards of glass in their masks when they tried, so they had to change.

“It definitely came from COVID,” he said.

He said he was leading similar projects in more advanced art classes and it seemed like a good substitute for the glasswork they would normally do.

“It’s fun teaching 3D art to kids,” he said. “… I think children are more successful working with their hands than with the paintbrush.”

Senior Quimn McDonald, 18, said she had fun building her dragon, although she had to spend almost an entire day carving the triangular cardboard scales that now adorn it.

“I always have fun in art class,” said McDonald.

She said she planned for a black, red and gold color scheme after the clay layer was applied.

Year one Arabella Dabis, 15, takes it a step further with her portrayal of Maleficent, but it wasn’t without tribulation and change of plans.

“Getting the base upright was tough,” Dabis said. “… It was going to be an angel but there were a few missteps.”

Griggs said teaching 3D sculpting was fun, and he could keep it for years to come, for practical reasons at least.

Havre Daily News / Colin Thompson

Sculptures in progress rest on a table Wednesday in an art class at Le Havre high school.

“It’s really cheap compared to glass,” he said.

The students in his class have certainly been busy, he said, having worked with wax on cloth and mirror engraving, with pottery to come.

He said he had other classes he wanted to do stained glass with this year, but now has to wait.

Griggs said COVID-19 has been tough on art classes, with the first semester of this year being very tough with students in class two days a week.

“Online has been kind of a nightmare,” he said.

He said he was able to teach students at home using an art theory textbook, which was not difficult, but cannot be compared to hands-on learning.

“I taught English for 14 years so it was easy but not exciting at all,” said Griggs.


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3D art exhibition unveiled in Italy – La Merciade https://arkenyon.com/3d-art-exhibition-unveiled-in-italy-la-merciade/ https://arkenyon.com/3d-art-exhibition-unveiled-in-italy-la-merciade/#respond Wed, 31 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/3d-art-exhibition-unveiled-in-italy-la-merciade/ French street artist JR unveiled his major new art installation last week in Florence, Italy. Located on the front wall of Palazzo Strozzi, a historic cultural center in central Florence, the work is a stunning optical illusion 91 feet high. It is called “La Ferita” or “The plague”. Passers-by will see a heart-wrenching gash along […]]]>

French street artist JR unveiled his major new art installation last week in Florence, Italy.

Located on the front wall of Palazzo Strozzi, a historic cultural center in central Florence, the work is a stunning optical illusion 91 feet high.

It is called “La Ferita” or “The plague”. Passers-by will see a heart-wrenching gash along the Renaissance-style exterior. The illusion is created by manipulating depth, which gives the viewer the impression that they are seeing a 3D object, rather than a 2D painting.

Inside the wound, viewers will see an imaginary black and white collage of the interior of the building. The mock interior is complete with marble columns, famous paintings, sculptures, and a library at the top.

The artwork is said to represent the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on cultural sites around the world, many of which have been closed for more than a year. Museums, theaters, libraries, galleries and other cultural sites have all been additional victims of the pandemic.

“Walking around Florence is weird these days, without the visitors who are part of Florence life, it’s quiet and less busy. Without being able to enter a museum, attend a concert or spend time at an exhibition, we realize that it is culture that gives life its color and that the beauty of our city is activated by the people who live it. cross, to soak up the history and culture of Florence, and leave enriched by it, ”JR said in a statement to CNN.

JR, whose real name is unknown, started doing street art in Paris at the age of 13. Since then, his work has been presented in places around the world, from Europe to the Americas. CNN reports that the unveiling of “La Ferita” also marks the start of Palazzo Strozzi’s future art program.

The initiative aims to promote modern and contemporary art in Italy, with a new public art installation revealed each spring in Florence.

The director of Palazzo Strozzi, Dr Arturo Galansino, issued a press release saying that the art center has a “unique” determination to “forge a dialogue between the classic and the contemporary through the participation of artists capable of ‘interpret the present.

“Regarding the new artistic gash on his building, Galansino said“ it is appropriate that we start the program with the new work by JR “La Ferita”. (It’s) a powerful reflection on the difficult conditions surrounding access to culture in the era of COVID-19, but also a symbol of freedom, creative imagination and participation and an opportunity to engage the public , the general public, in a totally new way. “


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Susan Schwake’s “3D Art Lab for Kids” hits Iranian bookstores https://arkenyon.com/susan-schwakes-3d-art-lab-for-kids-hits-iranian-bookstores/ https://arkenyon.com/susan-schwakes-3d-art-lab-for-kids-hits-iranian-bookstores/#respond Mon, 11 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/susan-schwakes-3d-art-lab-for-kids-hits-iranian-bookstores/ TEHRAN – A Persian translation of “3D Art Lab for Kids: 32 Hands-on Adventures in Sculpture and Mixed Media” by Susan Schwake was recently published by Vijeh-Nashr Publications in Tehran. The book was translated into Persian by Jamal Akrami and Mina Mani. The book encourages artistic spirit in children with 36 kid-friendly art projects made […]]]>

TEHRAN – A Persian translation of “3D Art Lab for Kids: 32 Hands-on Adventures in Sculpture and Mixed Media” by Susan Schwake was recently published by Vijeh-Nashr Publications in Tehran.

The book was translated into Persian by Jamal Akrami and Mina Mani.

The book encourages artistic spirit in children with 36 kid-friendly art projects made from paper, clay, textiles, sculpture and jewelry. Each project is inspired by the work of a distinguished artist and is illustrated with step-by-step color photographs of the process as well as finished samples and variations.

Colorful photos illustrate how different people using the same lesson will produce different results, illustrating how the lesson brings out each artist’s personal style. On-site visits to the workshops of an established potter, goldsmith, jeweler, and sculptor illustrate first-hand accounts of their creative processes.

3D Art Lab for Kids” is the perfect book for creative families, friends, and community groups, and works as lesson plans for both experienced and new art teachers. Children of all ages and abilities can be guided by adults and will enjoy these engaging exercises.

The popular “Lab for Kids” series features a growing list of books that share hands-on activities and projects on a wide range of topics, including art, astronomy, clay, geology, math and even how to create your own circus, all written by recognized experts in their field.

Each lab contains a complete list of materials, clear step-by-step photographs of the process, as well as finished samples. Labs can be used as one-on-one projects or as part of a one-year experiential learning program. Activities are open-ended and designed to be explored over and over again, often with different results. Designed to be taught or guided by adults, they are rewarding for a range of ages and skill levels.

Schwake is an artist, art educator, author and curator. Her passion for teaching art for over 20 years has led her to work in many diverse contexts, as well as in her own art school, which works in collaboration with their gallery and design company in New Hampshire, called Artstream.

Susan exhibits her own works of art in galleries in the United States and Europe. To date, she has organized over 100 fascinating contemporary exhibitions in her own gallery with hundreds of works by national and international artists. Susan has worked with many companies installing original artwork from the gallery’s stable of artists.

True to her passion for art and teaching, Susan has offered and continues to offer workshops and programs to parents, university teachers, art studios, community organizations, public and private schools, and more recently online with online courses for teachers. training, painting, printmaking and mixed media.

Photo: Cover of the Persian translation of “3D Art Lab for Kids” by Susan Schwake.

RM / MMS / YAW


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Thurso Artist Hosts Free 3D Art Exhibition This Sunday https://arkenyon.com/thurso-artist-hosts-free-3d-art-exhibition-this-sunday/ https://arkenyon.com/thurso-artist-hosts-free-3d-art-exhibition-this-sunday/#respond Fri, 30 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/thurso-artist-hosts-free-3d-art-exhibition-this-sunday/ A Thurso-based digital artist plans to bring an innovative and technological twist to the local art scene on Sunday, November 1 in the form of a free interactive online exhibition. To rejoin Lisa Poulsen as she guides visitors through a fully narrated 3D virtual exhibit titled The StoneScape Story. Lisa Poulsen’s banner ad for her […]]]>

A Thurso-based digital artist plans to bring an innovative and technological twist to the local art scene on Sunday, November 1 in the form of a free interactive online exhibition.

To rejoin Lisa Poulsen as she guides visitors through a fully narrated 3D virtual exhibit titled The StoneScape Story.

Lisa Poulsen’s banner ad for her 3D special this weekend.

Upon entering, visitors can listen to an artist’s talk illustrating the most important adventures and influences of Lisa’s creative journey. They can then virtually browse the entire StoneScape collection and immerse themselves in each room with an oral interpretation of the artist.

Lisa said: “The idea of ​​organizing a virtual art exhibition struck me while generating ideas for the next Caithness Market which takes place this Sunday November 1st.

“Displaying the entire StoneScape collection under one roof and the story of how it all happened has been on the cards for a long time, but with the current restrictions and people’s sense of connection diminishing as a result, I thought why not take an online exhibition for all to see. Although timely set up, the exhibit is relatively inexpensive to run and very accessible to people who can view it from anywhere in the world. “

Lisa Poulsen, center, showing off her Inspired by Caithness line at a Taste North event last year.  Image: DGS
Lisa Poulsen, center, showing off her Inspired by Caithness line at a Taste North event last year. Image: DGS

Lisa said the preparation for the exhibition was a lot like the “real deal” between art curation, virtual hanging and even music sourcing and brought back fond memories of her years as a student. in design.

“I am delighted that Scottish folk duo Charlie Gray and Joseph Peach will be providing live recorded music at the Lyth Art Center last year, so be sure to activate your speakers when you arrive at the exhibit,” she added.

StoneScape’s story is free to access and can be viewed online at www.inspiredbycaithness.com/exhibition from 11 a.m. on Sunday November 1 as part of #CaithnessMarket – a virtual marketplace taking place on Facebook and Instagram with over 50 local small businesses registered to participate. Lisa’s show will run for a month until December 1.

Businesses go live between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. during the day, offering exclusive discounts, demos, new product launches, and question-and-answer sessions. Each company pays a registration fee of £ 10 to participate, 100% of which goes to a local charity nominated by public vote.

This month’s charity is Friends of Annie, which supports youth with care experience in Caithness.

Visit www.facebook.com/caithnessmarket for more information and regular updates.

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