Art object – Arkenyon http://arkenyon.com/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 23:48:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://arkenyon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-24-150x150.png Art object – Arkenyon http://arkenyon.com/ 32 32 TW Fine Art presents “Sky’s The Limit” https://arkenyon.com/tw-fine-art-presents-skys-the-limit/ https://arkenyon.com/tw-fine-art-presents-skys-the-limit/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 13:23:21 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/tw-fine-art-presents-skys-the-limit/ TW Fine Art is pleased to present Sky’s The Limit, a group exhibition featuring paintings and illustrations by Alberto Pazzi, Roger Allan Cleaves, Carles Garcia O’Dowd and Spencer Chalk-Levy. The show explores the unique cosmogony of each of the four artists as they construct new, idiosyncratic worlds through their work. The exhibition highlights the influences […]]]>

TW Fine Art is pleased to present Sky’s The Limit, a group exhibition featuring paintings and illustrations by Alberto Pazzi, Roger Allan Cleaves, Carles Garcia O’Dowd and Spencer Chalk-Levy. The show explores the unique cosmogony of each of the four artists as they construct new, idiosyncratic worlds through their work. The exhibition highlights the influences that inform artists’ approach to world building and storytelling, from their personal lives and past experiences to their creative inspirations. Sky’s The Limit will be on view from October 19 to November 28, 2021, with an opening event on October 19 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. EST.

Each of the artists in the exhibition tackles the idea of ​​world building with its perspective, process and aesthetic. Alberto Pazzi is known for his autographic illustrations and paintings and his penchant for bubble gum pink paper. Through recontextualized pop culture motifs, Pazzi shares pastiches of his own lived experiences through surreal scenes. His character-laden pieces stretch the mind to imagine impossible configurations of places, people and things. Roger Allan Cleaves takes a more narrative approach; his work centers on “The Land of the Forget Me Nots”, which imagines a fictional multiverse as a way to examine social themes, fantasy and epic adventures through the prism of Afrofuturism. In his work, he creates and populates new worlds that balance questions of artistic expression and sociological ideas through storytelling. Carles García O’Dowd takes us to “Eden”, a land populated by “topoids” and “yoyos”. GOD. adopts an imaginary pop cosmogony that gives him space to examine and critique the contradictions present in neoliberal societies. His drawing and printmaking work is heavily influenced by his experiences with activism, counterculture, pop music, and cartoons. Spencer Chalk-Levy will present his work at TW Fine Art for the first time with this exhibition. His designs represent expressive casts of figures who feel both contemporary and Renaissance inspired. Spencer will launch his “Batalion 102” series and another series depicting a high-end Viennese brothel from different angles.

When these artists are exhibited together, their works offer possibilities for alternative and competing universes, sparking new conversations about the generating potential of visual art in bringing about tangible change. Sky’s The Limit aims to prove that a better world is possible – if only we can envision it.


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Coldago pours cold water on Gartner Distributed Files and Object Storage MQ – Blocks and Files https://arkenyon.com/coldago-pours-cold-water-on-gartner-distributed-files-and-object-storage-mq-blocks-and-files/ https://arkenyon.com/coldago-pours-cold-water-on-gartner-distributed-files-and-object-storage-mq-blocks-and-files/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 08:32:26 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/coldago-pours-cold-water-on-gartner-distributed-files-and-object-storage-mq-blocks-and-files/ An interview with Coldago research analyst Philippe Nicolas revealed what he sees as vendor and product choices that he believes weaken Gartner’s distributed file systems and MQ object storage. Read the Q&A below and see what you think. Blocks and files: Should distributed file systems and object storage be considered one category? Philippe Nicolas. Philippe […]]]>

An interview with Coldago research analyst Philippe Nicolas revealed what he sees as vendor and product choices that he believes weaken Gartner’s distributed file systems and MQ object storage.

Read the Q&A below and see what you think.

Blocks and files: Should distributed file systems and object storage be considered one category?

Philippe Nicolas.

Philippe Nicolas: Um, that’s a good question. What is true is that both address unstructured data, but many applications can use one and not the other, even though the access method is standardized. At the same time, we are seeing more and more vendors offering both interfaces. This clearly creates a challenge when you need to analyze the segment.

If we think of these two access models as one category, Gartner must select products that do both to avoid a penalty for file or object providers alone. But why should a supplier be penalized for offering only one interface, especially when it can be of very good quality?

Viewing the two as one category invites us to make the same point that we have made for years: Gartner considers one product for some suppliers and multiple products for others, and therefore creates an unfair or unbalanced comparison. So the real question is: are we comparing a product or are we comparing suppliers?

Some vendors, such as Pure Storage and Scality, combine file and object storage. Shouldn’t analysts do the same? and if not, why not??

And you can add Caringo (now DataCore), Qumulo, DDN, Dell, NetApp, VAST Data or Cloudian to expand the list; I’m probably even forgetting a few. This is a general response that demonstrates once again that the differentiators between offers are reduced year by year. It is also a sign of maturity. Checking the boxes in tenders does the job, but the behavior of the product is very different.

The way providers implement their access layers is really different. But it also confirms the merger between the offerings – as they’re basically two access methods to access the same unstructured content.

Also, you can merge the category, but what about pure object storage or pure file storage products / providers? Does this mean that we need separate sub-MQs for each category with the presence of actors who provide the individual access layers? I think that’s where other analyst reports come in, and users need to consider several of them to form their own ideas and opinions.

Purists will tell you that object storage is more than just an interface and they’re right, but no one today cares about internal design, especially when products expose both interfaces. Many users ask their providers, “Could you expose my content to a file server through S3?” And the reverse too.

But all of these products are far from equal when you look at the access methods. Are you really comparing native NFS access built on object layers and vice versa? Of course, this can offer some flexibility, but user experience shows very diverse capabilities and realities.

And finally, the problem with bringing the two together is that some pure file or item players are penalized. And it’s a paradox: you can be a great product in one category but poorly positioned in the global quadrant. On the other hand, having both, say with average abilities, offers artificial advantages.

Look at the trajectory of VAST Data in the market – not having it listed is quite bizarre and makes this report a bit incomplete.

With flash hardware and better-designed object software accelerating object storage to filer-level performance and thus to satisfy primary storage roles, don’t the two access protocols (file and object) merge ?

Flash has been used in storing objects for metadata for a long time, and it was too expensive for data for large setups. But the reality was also that some object storage products did not receive any performance gain by using flash for data and several of them had to adapt, modify and update their software to maximize the gain. And then the flash prices fell, which created additional opportunities.

Your point is interesting. I remember a recent study from a vendor claiming that object storage with flash can do primary storage. In fact, primary storage is only determined by its role and not by technology. Many people limit primary storage to block storage and this is a very narrow view of the industry. Primary storage is where data is generated and hence it is active and considered hot data. It supports production and supports the business. With that in mind, we understand that it can be a block, file, or object, be it a hard drive, flash, SCM, or full DRAM.

On the other hand, secondary storage is a level of protection, necessary to protect the business and support IT in its mission. Data is not generated here, it is copied from the primary level. This secondary level is full of inactive data – cold and even fixed or benchmark. Here we also see block, file or object access systems.

Your questioning confirms, once again, that object storage has become an interface in people’s minds.

What do you think of the overall relevance and usefulness of the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Distributed File Systems and Object Storage?

I like that, I like this exercise, it’s good that such tools exist with several others to invite users to read and analyze several of them, understand the context and the criteria to form their own opinion. We just regret that some visible players are not listed and that Gartner has not accepted or factored in the points that a lot of other people make year after year.

Even if one understands the criteria chosen by Gartner, it is always a surprise not to see certain players because they refuse to be listed or because Gartner eliminates them. Look at the trajectory of VAST Data in the market – not having it listed is quite bizarre and makes this report a bit incomplete.

And open source? What about MinIO, clearly the number one object storage by the number of instances running on the planet?

And the reverse is also true in this MQ. I’m pretty sure all readers were surprised to see some brands on it this year.

How should and could IT buyers find MQ-like information about distributed file systems and object storage providers if Gartner MQ is rejected?

Hmm, there is no single source of information and I invite buyers to do their own research for similar reports and analysis to build their own matrix with their own criteria as a mixture or union of these documents. . Honestly, they already do it for tenders; it’s just an extension. When they need to research the state of the art in an area, they have to do it. A good source is a few key news sites like yours, StorageNewsletter, TechTarget, Speicherguide.de and a few others that go beyond just issuing press releases and analyzing things. And finally, if buyers can speak directly with users who have already deployed and adopted solutions, they will get great contributions.


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“Underground Modernist: E. McKnight Kauffer” at the Cooper Hewitt https://arkenyon.com/underground-modernist-e-mcknight-kauffer-at-the-cooper-hewitt/ https://arkenyon.com/underground-modernist-e-mcknight-kauffer-at-the-cooper-hewitt/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 15:43:40 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/underground-modernist-e-mcknight-kauffer-at-the-cooper-hewitt/ The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum is currently home to the largest exhibition of works ever produced by E. McKnight Kauffer (American, 1890–1954), a pioneer of commercial art, the profession known today as design graphic. On view from September 10 to April 10, 2022, Underground Modernist: E. McKnight Kauffer presents over 150 objects to examine […]]]>

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum is currently home to the largest exhibition of works ever produced by E. McKnight Kauffer (American, 1890–1954), a pioneer of commercial art, the profession known today as design graphic. On view from September 10 to April 10, 2022, Underground Modernist: E. McKnight Kauffer presents over 150 objects to examine the impact and the designer’s legacy through media.

Hailed during his lifetime as “the king of posters”, Kauffer brought design to many creative industries. He made modernism accessible by applying cutting edge styles to designs for advertising, literature, theater, transportation, etc. It has adopted the emerging avant-garde aesthetic in a provocative way to promote services and products.

Cooper Hewitt holds one of the largest collections of Kauffer’s designs in the world, including material in both the Drawings, Prints & Graphic Design department and the Archives department. The exhibition is curated by Caitlin Condell, Associate Curator and Head of Drawings, Prints & Graphic Design at Cooper Hewitt, and Emily M. Orr, Ph.D., Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary American Design at Cooper Hewitt, with Caroline O ‘Connell, Conservation Assistant, and Kristina Parsons, Conservation Assistant.

Underground modernist will reveal new stories and research to position Kauffer not just as a poster designer, but as a figure who has widely applied the graphic arts to creative pursuits, ”said Condell. “It transformed the public’s perception of modernism and influenced the work of other equally important artists, designers and writers on both sides of the Atlantic.

“Building heavily on Cooper Hewitt’s unique collections of Kauffer’s work, the exhibition will explore the wide circulation and popular resonance of Kauffer’s creations,” said Orr. “Motivated by the desire to serve the public, Kauffer brought art closer to everyone. He believed that advertising was an opportunity to introduce new visual expression.

Organized chronologically into ten sections, the exhibition will trace Kauffer’s career from his beginnings as a painter to his transformation into an internationally renowned commercial artist. At the peak of his career in the 1920s and 1930s, Kauffer, an American, was one of England’s most influential artists. In 1940, he moved to New York, joining the influx of European designers who boosted American advertising. His remarkable output includes eye-catching posters for the London Underground, illustrations of famous literary works and iconic graphics for major corporations such as Shell-Mex and American Airlines.


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Residents oppose cell tower extension https://arkenyon.com/residents-oppose-cell-tower-extension/ https://arkenyon.com/residents-oppose-cell-tower-extension/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:27:28 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/residents-oppose-cell-tower-extension/ Rise and shine, Avon! Catch up with each other to start this day on an informed note. Here’s everything going on in town today. First of all, the weather forecast for the day: Periods of sunshine. High: 71 Low: 50. Here are today’s top stories at Avon: Avon’s neighbors warn of a horror if the […]]]>

Rise and shine, Avon! Catch up with each other to start this day on an informed note. Here’s everything going on in town today.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Periods of sunshine. High: 71 Low: 50.


Here are today’s top stories at Avon:

  1. Avon’s neighbors warn of a horror if the city extends the cell tower an additional 46 feet (Hartford Current)
  2. Treats along the CT Chocolate Trail to sink your teeth into this Halloween (Insider CT)
  3. Town Of Avon: NAMI Presents: Cannabis And Mental Health Tuesday, October 5 at 7 p.m. (Avon Patch)
  4. UConn quarterback and Avon Old Farms former Tyler Phommachanh are out indefinitely as the Huskies prepare for UMass (Insider CT)
  5. 2022 F Jake Percival of Avon enters UConn men’s hockey (The UConn blog)
  6. Experts say this fall is expected to feature vibrant foliage in Connecticut (theday.com)

Today’s Avon Daily is brought to you from our friends at GoodRx – the best way to save money on your prescriptions. GoodRx helps you find the lowest prices for drugs at local pharmacies, so you don’t overpay. Also works for pet medications! To see how much you can save, go to GoodRx.com.

  • Farmington Valley Arts Center: “Here are some of the wonderful artwork from the student art exhibit in our Drezner gallery: #studentartshow #artists @virgoprof #nelshighberg #mixedmedia #abstract #nfs #maryemarsan #tree #acrylic #collage #ashleygonzalez #treepumpkin … “(Facebook)
  • Talcott Mountain Science Center and Academy: “DON’T MISS THIS! This Wednesday, go ‘Behind the Big Screen’ with Talcott alumni Greg La Salle, Robin Cloud and Ben Levy. With experience on independent productions, HBO Entertainment and blockbusters like Deadpool, The Avengers, Beauty &. .. “(Facebook)
  • Avon / Canton Chamber of Commerce: “It’s October and oh my ‘gourd’, do we have some great networking opportunities this month. It all starts on Wednesday 10/6, with our ‘Morning Business Network Connection’ at the Golf Club of Avon. We are following. this This Thursday … “(Facebook)
  • Avon Free Public Library: “October Teen Writers Block Wednesday October 13 at 4:00 pm (via Zoom) open to teens entering grades 7 to 12. This group is for teen writers looking to find other teens with similar interest. This group is run by Juliana Spink Mills, one won … “(Facebook)
  • Avon Free Public Library: “Fall Documentary Film Talk Series (Virtual Program) Monday, October 18 at 7:00 p.m. (via Zoom) Join us Monday nights at 7:00 p.m. in October! Watch these movies at home, then join us for a Zoom discussion with Bob Kagan. Bob Kagan … “(Facebook)

From our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!

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Alright, all is well for today. See you soon! If you enjoy these newsletters, consider bringing in more friends and neighbors. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Richard kaufman

About me: I’m a local patch editor for Connecticut, covering Greenwich and Stamford. I love discovering what makes a community tick and sharing hard-hitting and meaningful stories with the community.

Got a tip or suggestion for an upcoming Avon Daily? I’m all ears. You can email me at richard.kaufman@patch.com.


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A look inside Samuel Ross’s book, Object – Form. Form! https://arkenyon.com/a-look-inside-samuel-rosss-book-object-form-form/ https://arkenyon.com/a-look-inside-samuel-rosss-book-object-form-form/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 08:57:32 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/a-look-inside-samuel-rosss-book-object-form-form/ British artist, fashion designer and industrialist Samuel Ross is best known for his work under his A-COLD-WALL * label, but since the multi-hyphen unveiled SR_A (Samuel Ross & Associates) in 2019, there has been a shift in his practices, tapping into the “progressive study of designing and creating practical experiences” that dominates his work as […]]]>

British artist, fashion designer and industrialist Samuel Ross is best known for his work under his A-COLD-WALL * label, but since the multi-hyphen unveiled SR_A (Samuel Ross & Associates) in 2019, there has been a shift in his practices, tapping into the “progressive study of designing and creating practical experiences” that dominates his work as part of the SR_A division. Now Ross – under the moniker SR_A – has released his first book, titled Object – Form. Form!.

The 457-page book feels more like an anthology of Ross’s work, frequently touching on his artwork and studies in the worlds of fashion and design while focusing on A-COLD-WALL * and his shoes, clothing. and pre- Fall / Winter 2021 Lookbook.

In the “Contribution of the Zeitgeist – Art” section, sincere letters to Ross written by dear friends and collaborators such as Takashi Murakami, Virgil Abloh, Futura, Daniel Arsham, Hans Ulrich Obrist and many more can be found, each decorating these tracing paper-like pages that add a technical touch to the book – expected, given publishing’s roots in A-COLD-WALL * and SR_A’s design approach.

As we go along, Samuel Ross himself becomes the center of focus, with photographs mostly taken by Oliver Matich spanning dozens of pages. Here, design objects such as the “Signal 3” project appear alongside the notes of each work, giving us a deeper insight into Ross’s fixation for the development of a futuristic language through furniture design, everything. by reflecting on the complex nature of the past and the future.

Again, another set of words comes from Nike Design Director John Hoke and Nike Global Senior Director of Influencer Marketing and Collaborations Fraser Cooke in the feature film “Contribution of the Zeitgeist – Design ”, later leading to Ross, more focused on design. works such as his A-COLD-WALL * x Beats Studio 3 Wireless Prototype collaboration, the Nike x Concrete Objects study for the London Borough of Hackney and the ACW * team with RETROSUPERFUTURE.

The theme repeats itself before entering a new round of contributions from the fashion world including hearing Grace Wales Bonner, Jerry Lorenzo, Jefferson Hack, Ib Kamara and many more from various global publications, leading to new to a direction of his work in fashion.

Object – Form. Form! is essentially Ross’s life’s work, immortalized. Available in limited quantities – notably, “Edition Two” will be limited to just 70 signed pieces – the independently published, pressed and printed book in England is due out on October 7 through a range of exclusive partners including ICA Boston, the London Design Museum, and Selfridges.



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Instagram’s Amalia Ulman talks about turning a pigeon into an art object | London Evening Standard https://arkenyon.com/instagrams-amalia-ulman-talks-about-turning-a-pigeon-into-an-art-object-london-evening-standard/ https://arkenyon.com/instagrams-amalia-ulman-talks-about-turning-a-pigeon-into-an-art-object-london-evening-standard/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:38:18 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/?p=65 I n February, the artist Amalia Ulman posted to her 125,000 Instagram followers a picture of a home pregnancy test. There, against ceiling tiles featuring an idyllic image of blue skies and fluffy clouds, was a clear message: a plus sign. Ulman’s message below the image read: “BOOM haha.” Her followers had grown used to […]]]>
I

n February, the artist Amalia Ulman posted to her 125,000 Instagram followers a picture of a home pregnancy test. There, against ceiling tiles featuring an idyllic image of blue skies and fluffy clouds, was a clear message: a plus sign. Ulman’s message below the image read: “BOOM haha.”

Her followers had grown used to provocative posts. In April 2014 Ulman began posting a series of images that seemed to reflect her new life in Los Angeles: breaking up with a boyfriend, becoming a “sugar baby” escort, having a boob job and drug-taking, before redemption through a new relationship, meditation and yoga. But in September that year she announced that it was all a performance. This prompted delight but also anger and bewilderment — for some who were embroiled in Ulman’s five-month hell-and-back confessional it was not a performance but a lie.

Now, as she prepares to open a new show at the increasingly influential Arcadia Missa gallery in Peckham, Ulman is again prompting debate below the line. The pregnancy test shot has been followed by a number of selfies featuring her growing bump. On March 26 she posed at a baby shower in Buenos Aires with her Argentinian grandmother; on September 16 she appeared with eight arms in a red dress, two of them cradling her belly, the others holding various office items, like a workplace Hindu goddess Durga.

Many followers take Ulman’s pregnancy at face value, wishing her congratulations, asking the due date. Others, though, are steamed up by her artistic use of social media: “Faking pregnant really isn’t cool,” said one, with a thumbs down emoji; “#Faker”, admonished another.

The pregnancy is “not really about a baby, it has more to do with the replication of self, and the idea of being pregnant with yourself, basically. But for a while people didn’t know if it was real or not,” says a very non-pregnant Ulman as she sits in an office at Arcadia Missa. The 27-year-old is over from Los Angeles to install the exhibition and it’s a return home of sorts: though she was born in Buenos Aires and grew up in Gijón, Spain, she studied at Central St Martins art college as a teenager and began her career here.

When she showed some of the pregnancy images in her installation at the prestigious Berlin Biennale earlier this year she “left it up to the audience to believe whatever they wanted to”. This is a key theme of these works: the way we construct our online identities. “No one ever really tells the truth online. But there’s this feeling that we should — that by not being true it’s less enjoyable in some way.”

Her new show is called Labour Dance. Again its title results from Ulman’s fascination with the online world: a YouTube trend in which pregnant women record themselves dancing to induce labour. Balloons will float about in the installation, set against wallpaper featuring clichéd stock images of the New York skyline. “I’ve heard my mum saying all her life how her tits look like deflated balloons because of me — that’s how women write about it in a lot of blogs and things like that,” she explains. “That idea of the tight balloon and deflated balloon is very female-body-related.”

Thinking about pregnancy has led her to explore her “own desire” for it, she says, but also to consider the complications, of being unable to get pregnant because of work and travelling. “And also because I have a disability, so if I get tired doing nothing, basically, how could I have a kid?”

That disability relates to a bus crash Ulman was in as she travelled from New York to Chicago in 2013. Her legs were crushed and she was airlifted to hospital. She continues to bear the scars today.

The accident inspired a poem and sound work, which formed part of a Geneva exhibition — which she directed from her hospital bed. “People say ‘Oh, you probably weren’t that sick because you made art’, but no — I made art because it made me feel better,” she recalls.

The disability has influenced her work in that “everything has become more compartmentalised” she says. “I have to plan things more ahead and have people helping me more.” And Ulman does a lot of preparation. For all the apparent randomness of her Instagram feed, for instance, she says that “with the performances I always have a script”.

She wanted the work to be like a caricature of herself and she knew that she wanted a sidekick, so that the performance was “more like old theatre, or silent movies, more exaggerated: ‘This is a performance! This is fiction!’. And to incorporate more clowning elements to it.”

Her sidekick is Bob, a pigeon. “I didn’t even care about pigeons — I don’t like birds. And I think that’s a challenge that I introduce into my work: I work with things I don’t necessarily like and then learn to like them. It’s an analysis of why we like things or not, why do we find something a good design or ugly or whatever?”

Ulman’s Instagram posts involving her feathered friend show this change in her affections. there she is with Bob on Valentine’s Day, on a split-screen, harmonising with herself as she sings the chorus to a Pixies hit: “Gigantic, gigantic, gigantic/ A big, big love.”

Bob regularly appears alongside Ulman in her weekly cartoons influenced by the New Yorker cartoonist Charles Barsotti. He even lives with Ulman and her boyfriend in LA.

I ask what he represents. She replies that “he’s half son, half weird flatmate… And in the performance he can be my son, he can be God, he can be my boyfriend — he can be all of these things.”

In another solo exhibition, opening in Paris later this month, Ulman will explore “how Bob went from being a disgusting pigeon to being an art object”, she says.

The performance has a distinct colour scheme — palpable when you see her Instagram posts in a grid — that evokes “old-school corporate America” and brands the performance, she says. Working from a studio in an office block, surrounded by accountants and lawyers has helped her focus on the corporate theme. And that in turn has inevitably led her to the US presidential election.

“The election has been very important for the whole performance,” she says. She’s fascinated that it’s boiled down to “a fight of stereotypes. America is divided between the middle classes who want to vote for Hillary, who are educated and read the New Yorker, and ‘white trash’. It was impossible for me to ignore that, because of the different material, like people using memes for politics, which is crazy.” The performance will end as the election is won and lost.

Among the ugliest material she has found online is in the material posted by “alt-Right” commentators: the Trump supporters who are among the most worthy candidates for Hillary Clinton’s “deplorables” tag. “I was interested in the alt-Right and the aesthetics they use to communicate: the anti-feminist memes, the ‘feminist cancer’, all this stuff,” Ulman explains. She has looked at prominent alt-Right individuals such as Breitbart columnist Milo Yiannopoulos and “how all these people communicate their memes and their hate speech” with their oft-repeated mantra that they are speaking “common sense”.

“But they really use it to construct their own truths,” she says. “And that’s what Trump does: he constructs his own truths and people listen to him and think it makes sense. Because, of course, you can construct your own commonsensical argument according to what is convenient to you.”

Ulman’s is much in demand: her work was shown at the Whitechapel Gallery and Tate Modern earlier this year. She’s unfazed by appearing in big museums because she’s so emotionally immersed in her latest piece. “With the Tate show I wasn’t excited at all because it was an old work,” she says. “It was good, because my mum gets to enjoy that. So she came over and she was, like ‘Ooh, the Tate!’ But personally I didn’t feel anything — that’s dead for me.”

If Ulman continues to put her finger so squarely on the pulse it’s likely that both new commissions and museum shows will pour in. I suspect that both she and her mum will be satisfied for some time to come.

Amalia Ulman: Labour Dance is at Arcadia Missa, SE15 until November 5; arcadiamissa.com


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Football in American Art: 1933-The Present https://arkenyon.com/football-in-american-art-1933-the-present/ https://arkenyon.com/football-in-american-art-1933-the-present/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 18:07:45 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/football-in-american-art-1933-the-present/ Like many team sports in Western Europe and North America, American football first emerged as a game for young, upper-class white men. Professional football dates back to 1892, when the first college players began to receive financial compensation for playing. Despite its relative rarity in the art world compared to other sports, artists have long […]]]>

Like many team sports in Western Europe and North America, American football first emerged as a game for young, upper-class white men. Professional football dates back to 1892, when the first college players began to receive financial compensation for playing. Despite its relative rarity in the art world compared to other sports, artists have long been constrained by the controversial history of football, its rules, its players, and the fervent culture of fandom it inspired to across the United States. The game remains a quintessentially American pastime: playing it, watching it and identifying with its teams and athletes. And the few artists who have explored it since its inception have been drawn to the cultural issues that come with it: the beauty of the male athletic body in motion, celebrity culture, the physical strain and damage that play can cause, the passion it inspires. among fans and pervasive questions about sexism, racism, inclusion, exclusion, exploitation and commercialism.

From honorary sculptures that celebrate athletic worth to lifelike portraits that humanize team members, to abstract prints that raise uncomfortable questions about violence and pain, the following seven artists prove this American cultural phenomenon is ripe for engagement. increasingly diverse artistic scene.


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Nicola Tyson: Maintenance boss | Art & Object https://arkenyon.com/nicola-tyson-maintenance-boss-art-object/ https://arkenyon.com/nicola-tyson-maintenance-boss-art-object/#respond Mon, 27 Sep 2021 15:07:19 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/nicola-tyson-maintenance-boss-art-object/ In her fall exhibition at Sadie Coles headquarters, Nicola Tyson presents nine new paintings alongside three groups of graphite drawings. Reflecting the close dynamic between painting and drawing that has activated his practice from the beginning, Maintenance boss builds on the artist’s acclaimed 2017 Drawing Room investigation, pushing her use of figuration and portraiture into […]]]>

In her fall exhibition at Sadie Coles headquarters, Nicola Tyson presents nine new paintings alongside three groups of graphite drawings. Reflecting the close dynamic between painting and drawing that has activated his practice from the beginning, Maintenance boss builds on the artist’s acclaimed 2017 Drawing Room investigation, pushing her use of figuration and portraiture into experimental territory – a place, as she describes it, of “pause, a hiccup of laughter and release”.

In Tyson’s new paintings, the intensity of color – applied in bold segments – is countered by a sense of mutability or suspension. Bodies intersect in objects and vice versa. The space seems to oscillate between luminous flatness and intimations of depth. Between the trees captures different organic structures on the verge of metamorphosis or exchange: twin tree trunks slice vertically through the composition, framing a more hesitant and disjointed stack of anatomical or cellular forms: a floral “head” pierced with a radial eye, a turquoise globe suggesting a torso, two disembodied red hands and a pair of colored cores.

In Hairpiece, the body resolves – or separates – into a sort of landscape, a brilliantly striated formation that vaguely suggests a head with a single recessed eye. Here and throughout his later paintings, Tyson depicts figures or creatures that seem to be suspended between material and psychological states, while being freed from the constraints of “narrative” or the structuring patterns of “iconography”. She said her images “never fully take off – or slip into the narrative – even if something is clearly going on. Instead, they stay locked in the claustrophobic loop (Maintenance boss) of the internal logic of the array.

The dual elasticity and intensity of Tyson’s imagery suggests an inner state as much as a physical state, conveying the idea of ​​”embodied experience”, that is, the experience of the individual body. Through a combination of sharp colors and ambivalent shapes, she evokes the interplay of perception, thought and feeling that characterizes such an experience. In Pencil, a female figure rendered from amorphous color shots grips a stick-shaped pencil in one of her magenta hands, wielding the drawing tool like a weapon. The painting oscillates on the borderline of the cartoon – the character’s pink head is featureless apart from the turquoise openings of his eyes – and yet retains an air of radical openness, accentuated by the fragile blank leaves hanging down in the background.

Tyson’s art draws on and contests with that of artistic ancestors as diverse as Maria Lassnig, Hans Bellmer and Pablo Picasso. (His 2013 book Dead letters men verbalizes this mode of combative engagement, in a series of letters to deceased male artists). Her practice has its roots in a time in the 1990s when, as she recalled, painting was considered “conservative at best and probably redundant”, yet she continues to assert the vitality of her medium from a contrary feminist mindset. “Art is a kind of collaboration,” she suggested. “This assumes that you understand some of the rules – and that they can change – but you, the viewer, fill in the necessary blanks and finish the job, do half the job.”

In three series of graphite drawings, Tyson tests and revisits the preoccupations of his paintings – those of psychology and anatomy, surface and depth, fixity and metamorphosis – on a condensed scale. Between lyricism and a sense of the visceral, his compositions with rigorous tones cover the emotional and gestural range of his practice, as the critic Mark Harris observed: “Tyson’s work arrives at a fatal imaginary which oscillates between the recognizable and an assortment. of contours and tones that rebel against their referential function.

Nicola Tyson (b.1960, London), has exhibited internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include Four Paintings, Sadie Coles HQ (2020); Beyond a Trace, The Drawing Room, London (2017); A Tendency to Flock, Headquarters of Sadie Coles, London (2017); Paintings and works on paper, Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, MO (2017); Works on Paper, Petzel Gallery, New York (2016); and GOODBYE / HELLO, Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris (2015). His exhibition Bowie Nights at Billy’s Club, London, 1978, White Columns, New York (which visited Sadie Coles’ headquarters, London in 2013), included an archive of fascinating and evocative photographs documenting the London club scene of the late 1970s. Recent group exhibitions include 100 Drawings from Now, The Drawing Center, New York (2020); ISelf Collection: Bumped Bodies, Whitechapel Gallery, London (2018); Drawing Room Biennale 2017, The Drawing Room, London (2017); Artistic Differences, ICA, London (2016) and Receipt of a Magical Agent, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson (2016). His work is in various prestigious public collections internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Corcoran Gallery. of Art in Washington DC and the Tate Modern. , London.


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QBox: Learning by partial transfer with active request for object detection https://arkenyon.com/qbox-learning-by-partial-transfer-with-active-request-for-object-detection/ https://arkenyon.com/qbox-learning-by-partial-transfer-with-active-request-for-object-detection/#respond Mon, 27 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/qbox-learning-by-partial-transfer-with-active-request-for-object-detection/ This article was originally published here IEEE Trans Neural Netw Learning System. Sep 27, 2021; PP. doi: 10.1109 / TNNLS.2021.3111621. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Object detection requires a lot of data annotated with bounding boxes to train the model. However, in many applications it is difficult, if not impossible, to acquire a large number […]]]>

This article was originally published here

IEEE Trans Neural Netw Learning System. Sep 27, 2021; PP. doi: 10.1109 / TNNLS.2021.3111621. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Object detection requires a lot of data annotated with bounding boxes to train the model. However, in many applications it is difficult, if not impossible, to acquire a large number of tagged examples for the target task due to the privacy issue or lack of reliable annotators. On the other hand, thanks to high-quality image search engines, such as Flickr and Google, it is relatively easy to obtain resource-rich untagged datasets, whose categories are a superset of those. target data. In this paper, to improve the target model with cost-effective monitoring from the source data, we propose a QBox partial transfer learning approach to actively query the labels of the bounding boxes of the source images. More precisely, we design two criteria, namely informativeness and transferability, to measure the potential utility of a bounding box to improve the target model. Based on these criteria, QBox actively queries the labels of the most useful boxes in the source domain and, therefore, requires fewer training examples to save the cost of labeling. In addition, the proposed query strategy allows annotators to simply label a specific region, instead of the entire image, and thus greatly reduces the difficulty of labeling. Extensive experiments are performed on various partial transfer benchmarks and a real COVID-19 detection task. The results confirm that QBox improves detection accuracy with lower tagging cost compared to advanced query strategies for object detection.

PMID:34570711 | DO I:10.1109 / TNNLS.2021.3111621


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CulturalDC presents Umar Rashid: Culinarism https://arkenyon.com/culturaldc-presents-umar-rashid-culinarism/ https://arkenyon.com/culturaldc-presents-umar-rashid-culinarism/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 12:32:01 +0000 https://arkenyon.com/culturaldc-presents-umar-rashid-culinarism/ Washington, DC – CulturalDC, a DC-based nonprofit known for supporting ambitious and timely artistic endeavors such as Jennifer Rubell’s Ivanka Vacuuming (2016), is pleased to have Los Angeles-based artist Umar Rashid (Frohawk Two Feathers) as the inaugural resident of his Capital Artist Residency program, an annual initiative dedicated to elevating the impactful discourse of visual […]]]>

Washington, DC – CulturalDC, a DC-based nonprofit known for supporting ambitious and timely artistic endeavors such as Jennifer Rubell’s Ivanka Vacuuming (2016), is pleased to have Los Angeles-based artist Umar Rashid (Frohawk Two Feathers) as the inaugural resident of his Capital Artist Residency program, an annual initiative dedicated to elevating the impactful discourse of visual and multidisciplinary artists of color.

Presented in a solo exhibition from September 24 to November 21, Rashid’s residency focuses on the production of the last installment of his massive 18-year-old fictional universe: “an alternative and feudal version of America that has nobility and titles ”. In this world, Rashid whimsically imagines the cultural intricacies of colonial-era class dynamics through intergenerational iconography, maps, cosmological diagrams, Afrofuturist sensibilities, and pop culture references from his upbringing, such as than the golden age of hip hop.

The exhibit, Culinarialism, focuses specifically on the class dynamics of food while poignantly acknowledging the problematic history of the DC region as an epicenter of inhumane international business practices. The show uses the narrative setting of a classy dinner attended by visiting colonizers and world dignitaries – the ultimate embodiment of how food that is available exclusively to a privileged class has always reached their plates at a human cost and immense environmental. During his research during his residency, Rashid discovered the nefarious recurrences that run through history, from mass slavery for the sole purpose of food production, to various iterations of the contemporary question of how quinoa was. a staple of Andean nutrition until global trends pushed prices up to some extent. which prevented its regional accessibility.

In the events depicted throughout the 17 works in the exhibition, Rashid punctuates the feast of wealthy dignitaries with an uprising led by slaves. The exhibit’s six large paintings, which feature anachronistic pop culture references such as a basketball game and a barbecue, detail various sequential stages of the event: preparing and receiving merchandise; animal hunting; parties and dances; the meal itself; and the uprising which closes the festivities, aided in part by the divine intervention of the Yoruba gods. The second group, eleven works mounted on wood and ink on paper that have undergone a tea pigment aging process, includes smaller pieces like regional maps and portraits of Belhaven (the titular colonizer of the fictional region) and his associates, as well as portraits of the leadership of the opposition movement.

Says Rashid, “The main focus of my work is the reimagined stories and histories of people of color, which are often marginalized and omitted from historical records – and the intricacies of race, gender, class and global power. in the colonial world. “In his work,“ iconography serves as a marker of place between past, present and future. ”His stories are“ overwhelmingly informed by the hip hop culture of the golden age of [his] youth ”, as well as various references to pop culture ranging from old to contemporary. “The culture of gangs and prison, as well as specific revolutionary movements over time, also influence my work. “

Regarding the show’s specific commentary on food as part of its broader exploration of class dynamics, Rashid remarked, “The whole history of food is an ancient colonial enterprise that originated in the world. ancient and continues to this day. Greed, complicity and duplicity torment us all and prevent us from creating a union that is not perfect, but rather an acceptable one. “

Addressing the harsh realities of today that have guided the development of the exhibition, Rashid explains: “In these times of relative abundance, the majority of people find it inconceivable that everything that is seen has not always been there. . The economics of food production have changed very little since the colonial era despite the fact that some countries have taken a more scientific approach to crop rotation, vertical farming and limiting livestock overgrazing. However, desertification due to overgrazing, the poisoning of lakes and rivers by fertilizers creates algal blooms, zootrophic diseases infest livestock and become transmissible to humans. There is the gross wastage and mismanagement of arable land to cultivate a single for-profit crop, resulting in devastation of land and ecosystems, and in some cases widespread death from famine and overwork. Apathy? Or a general lack of attention? And every now and then there will be a story about the human cost of commercial farming. Nobody cares, as long as the grocery store is open until 9 p.m.


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