Kinetic art http://arkenyon.com/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 19:59:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Tim Prentice: Changing the Movement of Kinetic Art http://arkenyon.com/tim-prentice-changing-the-movement-of-kinetic-art/ http://arkenyon.com/tim-prentice-changing-the-movement-of-kinetic-art/#respond Wed, 04 Aug 2021 13:15:10 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/tim-prentice-changing-the-movement-of-kinetic-art/ The task of the kinetic artist is not simply to make art move, but to move all who see it. The premise is motion for effect; the desired result is poetry in motion. This is what 91-year-old American artist and architect Tim Prentice has dedicated his career to. He is currently staging a major two-part […]]]>

The task of the kinetic artist is not simply to make art move, but to move all who see it. The premise is motion for effect; the desired result is poetry in motion.

This is what 91-year-old American artist and architect Tim Prentice has dedicated his career to. He is currently staging a major two-part exhibition at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Connecticut, his first solo show since 1999. What does he think? “I’m happy, but I’d be happier if they gave me a show when I wasn’t so run-down,” he jokes.

For the past half century, Prentice has lived near Cornwall in northwest Connecticut. It is a city of 1,500 inhabitants, half of whom, according to the artist, are “weekends, summer part-time workers or recovering New Yorkers.”

Above and above: exterior and interior of Tim Prentice’s 18th-century studio in Cornwall, Connecticut. Photography: Tim Prentice

“I’m quite isolated, which is an advantage in the current situation. I commute on the lawn, so I have been working at home for 45 years, “he explains over the phone from his workshop, an old farm founded in 1790 by a” man of ice cream “, who sold his frozen products to neighbors Farmers. His studio is in the old ‘Ice House’ and he uses an adjacent hay barn to display his works, but the artist’s main gallery is outside. all kinds of kinetic sculptures, hanging from trees and in the meadows.

In this part of the world, kinetic art is well established. The title of Prentice’s Aldrich show is “After the Mobile,” a direct nod to Alexander Calder, a name practically synonymous with “mobile”. Calder was a former Connecticut resident who in the 1930s adopted the term after Marcel Duchamp urged him to put a name on his weird, moving, windswept constructions. “Kinetic sculpture is a more sophisticated term for mobiles,” explains Prentice. “Kinetic sculpture is the one I prefer to use, because the mobile is so tied to Calder; it is as if he owns it entirely.

Tim prentice, Double banner, 2020, aluminum, stainless steel, Lexan. Courtesy of Tim Prentice

“It’s the challenge of any artist, to be inspired by someone, then spend the rest of their life trying to come out of their shadow”

Down, 1995, stainless steel, lead. Courtesy of Tim Prentice

‘After the Mobile’ will present 20 interior works, five exterior works and a video portrait of the artist, Workshop visit (2006), directed by Corey Shaff. The indoor exhibition will run until October 4, 2021, with outdoor works from September 19, 2021 to April 24, 2022.

Prentice first saw Calder’s work as a teenager and was fascinated. “I thought it was gravity defying, it never left my head, it was one of those great moments. I didn’t realize until a few years later that it had changed my life, ”he says. “There are a lot of people who are so influenced by Calder that you can hardly tell the difference. It’s the challenge of any artist, I guess, to take inspiration from [someone], then spend the rest of your life trying to get out of their shadow. ‘

“George Rickey was an intellectual, Alexander Calder was an artist”

Prentice met Calder a few times, but it was George Rickey – whom he describes as the “next in the papal succession of kinetic art” – that the artist first met. ‘It [Rickey] was interesting to me because he taught all his life and spoke very clearly about his work. He analyzed and taught what he was doing. Rickey was an intellectual, Calder was an artist.

More importantly for Prentice, Rickey demonstrated that Calder had not explored all avenues of kinetic art; there was still some land to claim. “I was like, ‘Oh goodie, I’ll see if I can add to the vocabulary. »» Prentice did it with complexity and on the basis of systems theory; physique with charm. While previous kinetic art had focused on how different shapes moved with each other, Prentice asked, “What if these shapes themselves change?” This has resulted in works that move but always return to their original form.

High: Two Oculi, 2008-2020, aluminum, stainless steel. Above: Vine, 2020. Courtesy of Tim Prentice

Although Prentice has worked in sculpture for half a century, architecture was his first language. “My father was an architect so he was my model, I had no other model, so I started automatically. I was brought up in the modern movement, and [my father] was the last generation of eclectics, so we weren’t in the same field of work at all – our views were so different. When people said, ‘Oh, it’s so good that you go into your father’s job’, it always made me cringe a little. ‘

Music has also played a permanent role in Prentice’s work, which has taken many forms. He made a hobby of making percussion instruments, went on a state-funded world folk singing tour with his wife to introduce American folk music to the world (and bring folk music from around the world to the house), and frequently works on a soundtrack of his favorites. , Bach and Bobby McFerrin. “Sculpture is about gravity and music is about time, but there are parallels.”

Tim Prentice: ‘After the Mobile’ (installation view), The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, until October 4, 2021. Courtesy of Prentice Colbert. Photography: Jason Mandella

Another influential figure was Josef Albers, under whom the artist studied at Yale. Albers led “Color Interaction,” a course Prentice took as an undergraduate student, only to come back seven years later and repeat the exact same course. “His whole thing was to limit options. Modernists said decorating was a sin – that’s the generation I was trained in. ‘ At first glance, Prentice’s work appears almost entirely devoid of color, even in a work titled Tribute to Albers, but its application is less literal. “I’m looking in the reflections,” he said. “We use a lot of aluminum and stainless steel – you get reflections from any space you find yourself in. If someone walks by with a red shirt, the room turns red. I haven’t given up on color, it’s just not the main topic.

In 1999, the circle came full circle when Prentice – along with architectural partner Lo-Yi Chan – was commissioned to design the headquarters of the Albers Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut. “It was a great honor. I was by far the least known of the people they considered, but I was the only person to have studied with Albers, so I guess I had an advantage.

Tim Prentice: ‘After the Mobile’ (installation view), The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, until October 4, 2021. Courtesy of Prentice Colbert. Photography: Jason Mandella

But for Prentice, being an architect was like being a conductor unable to play any of the instruments. In 1970, he decided he wanted to play instruments, turning to sculpture as a solution. In architecture, “you work on the designs and the drawings, wait to watch the construction, and it can take a year to see if you’ve made the right decisions. Like when you have to take a photo to the drugstore to develop and pick it up a week later – it’s maddening, ”he says. “With sculpture, you instantly learn from what you are doing. Now I work in spaces that others have designed, and I put the icing on the cake. ‘

Over the following decades, Prentice developed a knack for sensing the ambience and movement of a room. “If you’re making an order for a library or a church, you want the vibe to be quiet, relaxing, and serene, but if you’re making a room for an airport, people are wired and worried, ‘Are they late? Are they getting the right plane? And they might just catch a glimpse of him as they run away. It is not just the character of the architecture, but what is happening. His architectural background puts him in a good position to understand the nuances of space. “I like to think I have chops on both sides,” he says.

Lightweight carpet, 2010, Lexan, aluminum, stainless steel. Courtesy of Tim Prentice

Prentice’s seemingly complex but rational systems of bent, articulated wires and ultralight metal planes are hypersensitive to moving air. Thanks to undulating and flowing patterns, works such as Lightweight carpet (2010) and Double banner (2020) offer an illusion of fragility but are deceptively robust. They give in to the force of the wind but always recover. It is this approach that sets Prentice apart in the history of kinetic art and proves that there is life after Calder’s mobile.

But it all comes down to the game: playing instruments, playing in the legacy of kinetic art (indeed, Calder once made a living designing toys) and the challenge of embracing the game. ‘That’s the thing. most difficult, ‘Prentice muses. “If someone said to me: ‘You have all day, you have nothing to do, you can just play’, I would say: ‘OK, well, that’s for who, where is he going , how big is it going to be, how much is it going to cost? I have to make it a job. This is my dilemma.

So, in the midst of all the pre-planning and meticulous control, who, at the end of the day, has the right to play? “This is a critical question,” says Prentice. “Chance is left to the wind. We just make toys for the wind to play with, and hope the wind is curious enough. §

Prentice’s home and studio in Cornwall, Northwest Connecticut. Photography: Tim Prentice

Square Square, 2016. Courtesy of Tim Prentice


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Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade reminds regional artisans to submit their designs for 2022 | New http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-reminds-regional-artisans-to-submit-their-designs-for-2022-new/ http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-reminds-regional-artisans-to-submit-their-designs-for-2022-new/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 14:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-reminds-regional-artisans-to-submit-their-designs-for-2022-new/ FRÉDÉRIC, MD., July 28, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade will feature four new kinetic sculptures at its Carroll Creek exhibition all year round at April 2022. “The Frederick the community has fully embraced our kinetic art exhibit as well as our talented artisans, and as expected, we intend to replace […]]]>

FRÉDÉRIC, MD., July 28, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade will feature four new kinetic sculptures at its Carroll Creek exhibition all year round at April 2022.

“The Frederick the community has fully embraced our kinetic art exhibit as well as our talented artisans, and as expected, we intend to replace some of the current kinetic sculptures with equally impressive new ones, ”said Bernard Gouin, President of Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade.

The deadline for submitting new designs is Tuesday, August 31, 2021 To 5 p.m..

Details of this 2022 invitation, including the related request and agreement, are available on the Get Involved page of the Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade website at https://carrollcreekkineticart.org/get-involved/

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade is a privately funded non-profit project initiated and managed by the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek in Frédéric, Maryland, a service organization supporting local and global efforts to improve lives.

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade Executive Committee Members: Neil fay, Stephanie Fisher, Bernard Gouin, Mike pilch, Jim reinsch.

Contact: Bernard Gouin Rotary@carrollcreekkineticart.org 301-846-4900

Media contact

Bernard Gouin, Carroll Creek Kinetic Art, 301-846-4900, Rotary@carrollcreekkineticart.org

SOURCE Carroll Creek Kinetic Art


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Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade reminds regional artisans to submit their designs for 2022 http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-reminds-regional-artisans-to-submit-their-designs-for-2022/ http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-reminds-regional-artisans-to-submit-their-designs-for-2022/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-reminds-regional-artisans-to-submit-their-designs-for-2022/ “The community of Frederick has fully embraced our Kinetic Art Exhibit as well as our talented artisans and, as planned, we intend to replace some of the current Kinetic Sculptures with equally impressive new ones,” said Bernard Gouin, President from Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade. FREDERICK, Maryland (PRWEB) July 28, 2021 Carroll Creek Kinetic Art […]]]>

“The community of Frederick has fully embraced our Kinetic Art Exhibit as well as our talented artisans and, as planned, we intend to replace some of the current Kinetic Sculptures with equally impressive new ones,” said Bernard Gouin, President from Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade.

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade will showcase four new kinetic sculptures at its annual Carroll Creek Exhibit in April 2022.

“The community of Frederick has fully embraced our Kinetic Art Exhibit as well as our talented artisans and, as planned, we intend to replace some of the current Kinetic Sculptures with equally impressive new ones,” said Bernard Gouin, President from Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade. .

The deadline for submitting new designs is Tuesday August 31, 2021 at 5 p.m.

Details of this 2022 invitation, including the related request and agreement, are available on the Get Involved page of the Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade website at https://carrollcreekkineticart.org/get-involved/

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade is a private, non-profit project initiated and operated by the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek in Frederick, Maryland, a service organization supporting local and global efforts to improve lives.

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade Executive Committee Members: Neil Fay, Stephanie Fisher, Bernard Gouin, Mike Pilch, Jim Reinsch.

Contact: Bernard Gouin Rotary@carrollcreekkineticart.org 301-846-4900

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Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade Invites Regional Artisan Creations for 2022 http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-invites-regional-artisan-creations-for-2022/ http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-invites-regional-artisan-creations-for-2022/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/carroll-creek-kinetic-art-promenade-invites-regional-artisan-creations-for-2022/ “The kinetic sculptures currently on display have been very well received by the community and, as expected, we intend to replace some of these sculptures with new, equally impressive ones,” said Bernard Gouin, President of Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade . FREDERICK, Maryland (PRWEB) June 02, 2021 Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade plans to introduce […]]]>

“The kinetic sculptures currently on display have been very well received by the community and, as expected, we intend to replace some of these sculptures with new, equally impressive ones,” said Bernard Gouin, President of Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade .

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade plans to introduce four new kinetic sculptures in its annual Carroll Creek exhibit in April 2022.

“The kinetic sculptures currently on display have been very well received by the community and, as expected, we intend to replace some of these sculptures with new, equally impressive ones,” said Bernard Gouin, President of Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade .

Artisans in the region are invited to submit their creations before 5 p.m. on Tuesday, August 31, 2021.

The Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade Artistic Review Board will assess designs for creativity, composition, craftsmanship, diversity and impact, before they are submitted to the City of Frederick for final approval.

Details of this 2022 invitation, including the related request and agreement, are available on the Get Involved page of the Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade website at https://carrollcreekkineticart.org/get-involved/

The website also has a Gallery page displaying photos and videos of our current kinetic sculptures, information pages on artisans, sponsors and partners, as well as an Inspiration page featuring kinetic artwork from selected artisans of international reputation.

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade is a private, non-profit project initiated and operated by the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek in Frederick, Maryland, a service organization supporting local and global efforts to improve lives.

Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade Executive Committee Members: Neil Fay, Stephanie Fisher, Bernard Gouin, Mike Pilch, Jim Reinsch.

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Dr Bianca Beetson wins kinetic art competition http://arkenyon.com/dr-bianca-beetson-wins-kinetic-art-competition/ http://arkenyon.com/dr-bianca-beetson-wins-kinetic-art-competition/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/dr-bianca-beetson-wins-kinetic-art-competition/ Kabi Kabi / Gubbi Gubbi (Sunshine Coast) Wiradjuri (NSW), Dr Bianca Beetson has been named the winner of the Kinetic Art competition of the Dubbo Regional Council (DRC) – a national search to find an indigenous artist with a strong connection to the Wiradjuri nation to design one of the largest works of public art […]]]>

Kabi Kabi / Gubbi Gubbi (Sunshine Coast) Wiradjuri (NSW), Dr Bianca Beetson has been named the winner of the Kinetic Art competition of the Dubbo Regional Council (DRC) – a national search to find an indigenous artist with a strong connection to the Wiradjuri nation to design one of the largest works of public art in the New South Wales region. Dr Beetson is a visual artist who works in a wide range of media including painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, photography, and public art.

“I identify as Wiradjuri and have family ties to the indigenous Dubbo community through the Beetson / Majick family lines. I also have family living in Wellington who are descended from my great aunt Topsy Taylor. I see this as an opportunity to reconnect with the country and develop continued reciprocal relationships with the Wiradjuri community, ”said Dr Beetson.

All artists had to adhere to a theme of community, country, connection: finding common ground and, with her winning concept, Dr Beetson says she considered the process of applying for permission to enter. the country. Her proposed work uses expressive images of country, cultural knowledge and communities. The unique design was developed by cyanotyping, a process using the sun – the giver of life – to develop the image. Using kangaroo grass seeds, which are native seeds that grow along the three Dubbo rivers, Dr. Beetson created a design representative of a river.

“The river represents the Wiradjuri people and the communities connected to the three rivers and their tributaries. The river is also a donor of life for the community and the vital blood of the community. Without water we would not survive, ”said Dr Beetson.

Dr Beetson’s art will be on display on the side of the Telstra Exchange building, which will be located in the Old Dubbo Gaol Heritage Plaza. UAP was hired by the DRC to help with the construction and installation of the artwork.

DRC Cultural Development Coordinator Jessica Moore says Dr Beetson’s work is a great representation of the community coming together, after a strong pool of applicants initially applied for the paid opportunity.

“We were very happy to have 25 submissions for this contest. Through our evaluation process, we reduced that number to three really strong applicants and each piece of art was very unique and very distinctive and very different from each other which made the final selection process really difficult, but also really exciting, ”Ms. Moore said.

The project was funded by the NSW Government’s Regional Environmental and Tourism Growth Fund, with a budget of $ 5 million for the development of the Old Dubbo Heritage Plaza. This is part of the global Destination Dubbo: International Ready project, which the NSW government has funded to the tune of $ 10 million.

“I want to thank everyone who participated, for me it was a really enjoyable process and Bianca Beetson, I thought she was an outstanding candidate from the first time I saw part of her vision, and there were other fantastic candidates as well, but I think Bianca took a very unique and special look at what we have in this region, ”Dubbo member Dugald Saunders said.

Bianca Beetson concept 2

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. See it in full here.


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On Tour: Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Project Unveils Four New Sculptures | visual arts http://arkenyon.com/on-tour-carroll-creek-kinetic-art-project-unveils-four-new-sculptures-visual-arts/ http://arkenyon.com/on-tour-carroll-creek-kinetic-art-project-unveils-four-new-sculptures-visual-arts/#respond Fri, 14 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/on-tour-carroll-creek-kinetic-art-project-unveils-four-new-sculptures-visual-arts/ Carroll Creek Park is a unique sight no matter the time of year, from the colorful water garden in the summer to the glowing sailboats in the winter. And now, thanks to the Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade, the waterway will also be home to seven rotating sculptures year-round. The Promenade Art, a project of […]]]>

Carroll Creek Park is a unique sight no matter the time of year, from the colorful water garden in the summer to the glowing sailboats in the winter. And now, thanks to the Carroll Creek Kinetic Art Promenade, the waterway will also be home to seven rotating sculptures year-round.

The Promenade Art, a project of the Rotary Club of Carroll Creek, debuted last year with three sculptures near Market Street. The project has since added four new rooms and moved further into the creek, east of East Street, said Bernard Gouin, the founder of the project.

The new sculptures are all different in style. One represents a white lotus, while another represents in an abstract way the Old Frederick Maypole dancers.

“I hope what is in the creek right now will impress people, that they will want to participate,” said Gouin. “Someone will say, ‘I want to make a design’ or ‘I know someone who can do it and I’m ready to order or sponsor and partner in any way. “

Gouin, a member of the Carroll Creek Rotary Club, was inspired by the Gardens of Light in Montreal, which features colorful silk lanterns in all shapes and sizes. Instead of playing with light, he decided to pitch the idea of ​​kinetic sculptures, which move with the wind, at the Rotary Club in 2019. His associates were immediately on board.

“It’s hard to look at a kinetic sculpture and not be mesmerized by it,” Gouin said. “It is art in movement, it is a mixture with nature.”

In early 2020, the Rotary Club installed three sculptures in the creek near The Wine Kitchen as part of a pilot program. Gouin said he learned a few key lessons from the pilot, including that the sculptures were too close together and the location competed with the Color on the Creek boats in the summer and Sailing through the Winter Solstice in the winter.

By moving the sculptures east of East Street, the Rotary Club is also giving itself the opportunity to install more sculptures in the future. This part of the creek is also easier to work with due to its more sandy bottom and greater width, Gouin said.

Gouin initially partnered with the Ausherman Family Foundation in 2019 to launch a request for proposals for artists living within an 80 mile radius of Frederick.

“We don’t want to showcase artwork from across the country. We really want to promote regional talent, so teaming up with the Ausherman Foundation first helped us gain a foothold, ”said Gouin.

Last July, the Rotary Club launched its second call for tenders through its own channels since the project was better known. Gouin said the Rotary Club had approved five new designs, but couldn’t find a sponsor for the eighth sculpture.

Each sculpture is anchored to the bottom of the stream by a steel pyramid weighing approximately 1,300 pounds. Gouin worked with some of his former colleagues at CANAM Steel at Point of Rocks to design the pyramids, and Equipment Development Co. in Frederick made the first three as a donation to the press. This year, the club added five new pyramids with its own funding. Because the eighth sculpture was not sponsored, there is still an empty pyramid.

The plan is to have four rotating sculptures every year so that new sculptures are always on display. This means that the three introduced last year will be phased out in 2022 and four will take their places.

“This way, people will be able to walk as they please and enjoy it all year round,” said Gouin. “It will be interesting to see what the snow does … but it’s part of the learning curve.”

Gouin contacted businesses along Carroll Creek including Idiom Brewing, Steinhardt Brewing, Attaboy Beer, Smoketown Brewing Station, and Yakabod before the sculptures were moved. He said everyone was excited about the idea.

The first sculpture is placed just outside Idiom Brewing and the last is placed at the end of Carroll Creek Park. The sculptures currently on display will be in place for at least the rest of the year.

“We bring a lot of visitors out of town to the breweries, which helps elevate the rotating brand. … They see that the club is really involved in the community, ”said Danielle Doll, president of public relations for Rotary. “The club really aims to give back to the community in so many ways, and it’s only one really big way that we love to do it. “

Follow Erika Riley on Twitter: @ej_riley


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A moving look at kinetic art via “Apical Reform” based in Ahmedabad http://arkenyon.com/a-moving-look-at-kinetic-art-via-apical-reform-based-in-ahmedabad/ http://arkenyon.com/a-moving-look-at-kinetic-art-via-apical-reform-based-in-ahmedabad/#respond Thu, 22 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/a-moving-look-at-kinetic-art-via-apical-reform-based-in-ahmedabad/ Explore the world of kinetic art – a rare combination of science and design that leaves you mesmerized by its trance movement. We chat with the founders of the Ahmedabad-based art studio, Apical reform, directed by Amrish Patel and Darshan Soni. The Galaxy There is art that moves you and then there is art that […]]]>

Explore the world of kinetic art – a rare combination of science and design that leaves you mesmerized by its trance movement. We chat with the founders of the Ahmedabad-based art studio, Apical reform, directed by Amrish Patel and Darshan Soni.

There is art that moves you and then there is art that will literally move when you see it. The latter for novices is kinetic art – an art form that depends on movement for its effect. A marriage of art and science, kinetic sculptures are typically made from motorized parts or changing electronic images and have a more dynamic relationship with the viewer than a simple painting on display. Delving deep into this space is Ahmedabad-based design studio, Apical Design started with Amrish Patel and Darshan Soni.

Ahmedabad, the home of extraordinary design spaces, designers and architects is also the basis of the apical reform. Apical Reform makes its mark in this diverse portfolio, which creates unconventional and innovative functional works of art, bespoke art, kinetic art and parametric designs. The main parameters being to create “unique and original concepts, breathtaking experiences, attention to detail and finishes, and ease of transport”.

Apical reform

The two founders met through a mutual friend and, after working together on a few pilot projects, identified their “congruent passion for a particular genre and the type of work they wanted to do”. Merging their vision and interests, they formed Apical Reform in 2011 to serve a niche of innovative design.

Darshan Soni and Amrish Patel

Kinetic art forms may still be in their infancy in India. However, internationally, the style is making great strides and attracting the attention of millions of people in both public and private spaces. For designers, kinetic works of art “are the synergy between art, mathematics, mechanics, computer coding and electronics. The work of art comes to life through precise design and engineering. The works of art embody the aesthetic by using mechanical movement and movement accentuating every gesture and movement, the viewer is mesmerized by the hypnotic and trance movement of the kinetic works of art. It is art in motion.

Passionate about art from a young age, Darshan Soni converted his passion for design into a career in architecture with a degree from the Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT). Meanwhile, Amrish Patel turned away from his second-generation business to devote himself to a more creative passion: “I am very inspired by complex works of art, mechanical or kinetic. My journey started about 12 years ago when I was in Dubai and a piece of Maximilian Büsser and his friends. One of their watches was so intricate and inspiring at the time, it made me want to create works of art that stand out in the same way, ”shares Amrish Patel. Years later, pieces from Apical Reform are now on display in their MAD gallery. A goal the designer initially set was achieved in 2018 with their Stingray and Tornado pieces. In addition, others are in preparation.

the Ray, which was on display at the MB&F gallery, was one of the brand’s most inspiring yet rewarding pieces. An abstract work of art based on the way stingrays swim consists of 1335 moving parts. After creating more than 50 study models and 2 prototypes, they created a sculpture of cartilaginous ribs in metal. “The challenge was to get the 144 wings beautifully synchronized to perform the smooth, silent movement of the ray. Additionally, a tremendous amount of work went into achieving top quality finishes as well as silent mechanical movement. which enhances the fascinating experience of the viewer ”, share the designers.

Ray
The line

The effect of a kinetic work of art can be cyclical, but the technical innovation behind it is enormous. For designers, the first phase of this process is inspiration. “Inspiration arouses the energy necessary to create a work of art that engages people, evokes emotions and creates a unique experience. We create several static and functional models, virtual 3D models. visualizations, animations and research to clarify the concept, proportions and aesthetics. The next phase is to work on the details, working models, prototypes and rigorous testing. After successful tests and a working prototype, we create the final kinetic art. This whole process would take anywhere from 3 months to a year depending on the complexity and scale of the artwork, ”the designers share.

Apical Reform also offers functional works of art, that is, projects that easily fit into your home or workspaces like stairs and stairs. The Betula chairs, the fluid shape of which is visible with each layer precisely designed and assembled by hand, are popular among these project-based pieces. Whether it’s a camel or a city, Apical Reform’s bespoke services can turn anything into a work of art. Exploring spatial dynamics, hyper-personalized expression, recursive geometry, and objective lightness, these works utilize the studio’s vast design vocabulary, in-depth material research, and innovative engineering solutions to create unique collaborative pieces.

Apical reform 1

From wall series of their iconic Stingray and Serpentine styles to large public art installations, this innovative design house has an exciting and moving journey ahead.



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Soon your home could be a kinetic art gallery http://arkenyon.com/soon-your-home-could-be-a-kinetic-art-gallery/ http://arkenyon.com/soon-your-home-could-be-a-kinetic-art-gallery/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/soon-your-home-could-be-a-kinetic-art-gallery/ Ahmedabad is no stranger to artists and architects who test the limits of old materials while experimenting with new forms. Design studio Apical Reform, however, goes one step further: it reinvents the Indian art market itself, creating kinetic works of art with fascinating precision. The studio was founded by Darshan Soni and Amrish Patel in […]]]>

Ahmedabad is no stranger to artists and architects who test the limits of old materials while experimenting with new forms. Design studio Apical Reform, however, goes one step further: it reinvents the Indian art market itself, creating kinetic works of art with fascinating precision.

The studio was founded by Darshan Soni and Amrish Patel in early 2011, with a small group of designers who have remained a part of their core team to this day. “When we started, we were still getting to know each other, to experience and understand the materials,” explains Soni, an architect by training. “We started doing various types of projects including architecture, interior design and product design, but eventually we realized that the type of work we do really boils down to creating artwork. of art. Today, the studio’s work encompasses functional art – particularly usable furniture or decorative items that are works of art in their own right – and bespoke decorative art that is made to order. customer request. Yet their most important endeavor is kinetic art.

In this vein, Soni attributes to Maximilian Büsser and Friends, a radical watch brand that pushes the limits of futuristic, three-dimensional and sculptural watchmaking. “Their watches do so much with such high precision,” explains Soni, “It has become our goal to achieve that kind of quality, in terms of idea and also production.” Interestingly, as of 2018, Apical Reform’s kinetic artwork is on display and sold in MB&F’s MAD Gallery showroom.

While technology is not a small part of the process of creating kinetic art, the heart of every piece is the idea, the vision to bring an intangible experience to life. “Inspiration has to be strong,” says Soni, “If something hits us it’s a spark, it’s a start. After that, we sit down and draw and chat – what experience do we want to bring out? Soni gives the example of one of his first projects, Stingray, which was inspired by a trip to the Dubai Mall aquarium. “We were in awe of the beautiful creature and the way it appears to fly in the water,” he says. “It was the experience that struck us, it was this spellbinding movement that we wanted to bring out.” The resulting design is a piece that doesn’t look like a parting, but rather moves like a parting – it was the experience, rather than the shape itself, that inspired the piece. “Once we have that clarity in mind, we create sketches, 2D drawings and detailed 3D models with each nut and bolt,” explains Soni, “We create many mechanical working models to understand movement, the geometry and physics of this. “


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Zenith Defy 21 Felipe Pantone: High Frequency Sync Meets Kinetic Art (Updated With Live Photos) | Viewing time http://arkenyon.com/zenith-defy-21-felipe-pantone-high-frequency-sync-meets-kinetic-art-updated-with-live-photos-viewing-time/ http://arkenyon.com/zenith-defy-21-felipe-pantone-high-frequency-sync-meets-kinetic-art-updated-with-live-photos-viewing-time/#respond Thu, 25 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/zenith-defy-21-felipe-pantone-high-frequency-sync-meets-kinetic-art-updated-with-live-photos-viewing-time/ Zenith launched some of its bolder colourways on special editions of its ultra-high frequency Defy 21 chronograph (as evidenced by last year’s Ultraviolet and Pink editions and the recently unveiled Urban Jungle). For perhaps the most vibrant performance to date, the manufacturing has teamed up with Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone to create a timepiece he […]]]>

Zenith launched some of its bolder colourways on special editions of its ultra-high frequency Defy 21 chronograph (as evidenced by last year’s Ultraviolet and Pink editions and the recently unveiled Urban Jungle). For perhaps the most vibrant performance to date, the manufacturing has teamed up with Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone to create a timepiece he describes as “a piece of wearable kinetic art”. Here is a closer look at the Zenith Defy 21 Felipe Pantone.

The new Zenith Defy 21 Felipe Pantone (above) reflects the multicolored “kinetic art” of its namesake (below).

Zenith began its collaboration with Felipe Pantone in 2020, when the company offered the facade of its main building in Locle, Switzerland, as a canvas for contemporary artists to showcase their work. In Pantone’s case, this work revolves around the so-called “visible spectrum concept,” which uses the frequencies of light and refracted colors to inspire a rainbow of gradient color variations. Hence the choice of the Defy 21 model – the highest frequency chronograph wristwatch in production – as the stage for a radically different timepiece which, as Zenith puts it, “all about frequencies – visually and mechanically”.

Zenith has developed entirely new techniques to achieve the rainbow effects of the watch.

To execute Pantone’s vision for the Defy 21 watch that bears his name and style, Zenith had to develop new techniques never before used in watchmaking – such as the principle of “interference colors” applied to the movement’s multicolored bridges. , whose coating reflects a gradient of rainbow-toned metal. Months of testing by specialists were needed to find the appropriate solution to achieve this rainbow effect; the result is an innovative three-dimensional PVD with silicon particles as a surface treatment to produce a perfectly transitional color spectrum. Although the process has been standardized, each piece will take on slightly different colors, essentially becoming a unique work of art.

The three-dimensional PVD coating adorns the hands, markers and bridges.

The distorted lightning bolt shapes of the hour and minute hands are also derived from Pantone’s work, and their gradient rainbow effect is applied in the same advanced process as the movement’s bridges. Succeeding in creating both the unusual shape of the hands and their perfectly scalable colored PVD coating proved to be one of the most difficult challenges Zenith engineers faced in creating this highly unusual watch, and one of the many early watchmakers. Another is the moiré optical effect of the alternation of black and white bands on the upper bridges and parts of the dial, a recurring theme in the paintings and sculptures of Felipe Pantone. Thanks to fine laser engraving and lacquering techniques, so precise that they give an optical illusion of fluid movement in the contrast of the stripes, Zenith has been able to miniaturize this motif. Along with the painstakingly created hands, the open dial features a mix of gradient colors and blocks on its markers and counters.

Rainbow colored bridges are visible behind the black coated rotor.

The black ceramic tonneau case of the Defy 21 Felipe Pantone is enhanced with a grid pattern engraved on the bezel, and “FP # 1” engraved on the four corners of the case, denoting “Felipe Pantone El Primero.” “The” El Primero “, of course, refers to the movement, El Primero Caliber 9004, whose watchmaking claim to fame is its ability to record times to 1/100 of a second, made possible by the incorporation of two escapements – one for the main movement at 36,000 vibrations per hour, the other for the integrated chronograph at 360,000 vibrations per hour. The grid pattern of the bezel is found on the black textured rubber strap of the watch with a black DLC clasp at double unfolding, while a second rubber strap offers another touch of art.The latter has a central insert that goes from dark gray to a flash of all the colors of the spectrum depending on the light angle, the result of the iridescence caused by the surface of the material and the way it captures light.

The optical effect on the bridges is obtained by laser engraving and lacquering.

True to its artistic pedigree, the Zenith Defy 21 Felipe Pantone comes in a presentation box that mimics a hardcover book, complete with a miniaturized painting created exclusively by the artist featured on its cover, along with a signed certificate. Limited to 100 pieces, and available in Zenith boutiques and through the brand’s online store, the watch is priced at $ 19,900 in the United States.

The bezel grid continues on the rubber strap.


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Kinetic art table creates and erases endless zen patterns http://arkenyon.com/kinetic-art-table-creates-and-erases-endless-zen-patterns/ http://arkenyon.com/kinetic-art-table-creates-and-erases-endless-zen-patterns/#respond Mon, 22 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arkenyon.com/kinetic-art-table-creates-and-erases-endless-zen-patterns/ Simon Sörensen, a young Swedish engineer, created something that would delight Bill, Ted, and Confucius at the same time: a kinetic art table that erases any pattern it creates itself. The table, which shines, offers a Zen atmosphere with its metal ball gently sliding patterns in the sand. It is so calming that in fact […]]]>

Simon Sörensen, a young Swedish engineer, created something that would delight Bill, Ted, and Confucius at the same time: a kinetic art table that erases any pattern it creates itself. The table, which shines, offers a Zen atmosphere with its metal ball gently sliding patterns in the sand. It is so calming that in fact it can help you understand the idea that everything that has ever been created will one day be destroyed. (The painting inspires to philosophize, we can’t help it.)

Sörensen recently posted the art table on his YouTube channel, RCLifeOn. The engineer notes that he was inspired to make the unique table using a sand scribing machine he had heard of; one named Sisyphus.

Sisyphus, a company entirely separate from Sörensen, indeed manufactures clever tables featuring metal balls that unroll patterns in the sand endlessly. And, as you might expect, tables don’t come cheap. A company coffee table, for example, has a price tag of $ 2,000.

This kinetic art table uses magnetism and a metal ball to create and destroy endless zen patterns in the sand.

RCLifeOn

Sörensen, of course, creates his own unique table using unique construction methods, although he is essentially reverse-engineering the Sisyphus table. To drive the metal ball into the table, Sörensen uses a magnet attached to the rack part of a 3D printer; that is, the motorized part of a 3D printer that moves a material extruder along two axes.

With the motorized magnet under the table, Sörensen shows how he can move the metal ball in the housing above. And after figuring out how to overcome the ball’s tendency to make a horrible scratching noise as it moves across the glass, the rest of the work is just the icing on the cake.

This kinetic art table uses magnetism and a metal ball to create and destroy endless zen patterns in the sand.

RCLifeOn

Ultimately, while Sörensen’s setup isn’t as perfect as what we see on the Sisyphus website, it still looks stunning. And, more importantly, it works surprisingly well; moving his little metal ball slowly, endlessly, as fascinating geometric patterns blend in and out of existence. Speaking of which, looking at these geometric patterns can help you relax as well. And, oddly enough, makes you hungry. (Again, Bill and Ted would love the patterns.)

Feature image: RCLifeOn


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